executive director – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 01:35:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T154232.929.png executive director – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ 32 32 ‘Atheist Pirates’ Remove Religious Signs From City Streets – GV Wire https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/atheist-pirates-remove-religious-signs-from-city-streets-gv-wire/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 23:26:15 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/atheist-pirates-remove-religious-signs-from-city-streets-gv-wire/ Standing atop a ladder about 8 feet high, Evan Clark pulled at a sign nailed firmly to a utility pole at the intersection of Echo Park and Bellevue avenues, just beyond the 101 freeway ramps. The sign quoted John 14:6, and as Clark turned and tugged to detach it from the post, a man in […]]]>

Standing atop a ladder about 8 feet high, Evan Clark pulled at a sign nailed firmly to a utility pole at the intersection of Echo Park and Bellevue avenues, just beyond the 101 freeway ramps.

The sign quoted John 14:6, and as Clark turned and tugged to detach it from the post, a man in a car shouted, “The way. The truth. The life ! quoting the words of the Bible verse inscribed on the sign Clark was trying to remove. The man, Clark said, likely assumed he was placing the panel, not removing it.

“People put a lot of passion behind these signs and their messages and ideas about Jesus and God,” Clark said. “I don’t like to be confrontational about any of this. I just wanted to do this as a casual thing to keep our streets secular.

The idea started as a joke

Clark is part of the Atheist Street Pirates, a team of lookouts who track down and sometimes remove illegally placed religious material from public streets and overpasses around the city of Los Angeles and county neighborhoods. It is a subset of Los Angeles-based Atheists United, a nonprofit that has been in the city for nearly 40 years and seeks to “empower people to express values secularism and to promote the separation of government and religion”.

The idea of ​​street hijackers first emerged as a joke at an Atheists United meeting where members joked about what to do with the religious signs they encountered across town. Calling it “religious trash removal,” the alliteration inspired atheist street hacks. This led Clark to create a public Google Map database where they upload photos and locations of signage they encounter on their travels. The map currently shows about 70 signs across LA County, including material removed by hackers or others. They have been officially active since 2021.

If signs are “illegally abandoned, our hackers will report or loot,” Atheists United says on its website.

Since 2019, Clark, who identifies as an atheist and humanist, has served as executive director of Atheists United. He sees the organization as a space to build community for atheists. “The question of whether God exists can be left to theologians and philosophers,” he said. Atheists United hosts a “recovery from religion” support group and an addiction recovery program which is an alternative to Alcoholics Anonymous. The group also runs a monthly food bank and recently took a stargazing trip to Death Valley.

“Just because you don’t believe in God doesn’t mean you should lose access to the community,” Clark, 33, said. “We’re only going to go there because we live in a Christian society and we happen to not be believers in God.

This includes their latest initiative to clean the city streets of religious propaganda.

Religious symbols on public property targeted

Street hijackers don’t mind paid billboards or signage on church property because it sits within the separation of church and state, Clark said. It is the explicitly religious signs on public lands that they challenge. There is a difference, Clark notes, between people standing on a highway overpass holding a sign and posters left as a public nuisance.

It’s unclear where these signs came from, whether they were part of church-organized efforts or individuals doing it alone, but Atheist Street Pirates collected about 30 signs of varying sizes and designs.

Some banners are several feet wide with the words “TRUST JESUS”. Others are bright yellow and say “REPENT…or hell” or “Jesus is coming!” Then there are signs with stenciled letters that read “JESUS ​​IS COMING RU READY” and “Ask Jesus for Mercy.” Instead of throwing away the signs, the group is looking for creative ways, perhaps an art exhibit, “to show the significance of signage to the general public.”

For Clark, it’s not about “engaging in an arms race against religious signage.” If so, they would put up atheism placards to counter the religious posters. The goal, Clark said, is to “strengthen our commitment to a secular society.” Most of the signs they documented proselytize a specific religion, and he said it’s almost always Christianity, essentially becoming “gratuitous religious marketing for a religion on our highways.”

The greater Los Angeles area is home to residents who represent a wide range of faiths: Catholic, Pentecostal, Jewish, Buddhist, Mormon, Scientologist, Self-Realization Fellowship, Hindu, and Muslim. And religion in Southern California, wrote a group of sociologists and anthropologists from the University of Southern California, is being reinvented “as religious ‘no’s create new forms of community useful”.

“We are not finding a spiritual wasteland but rather a wild, wild West of religion,” they wrote in the 2016 article.

Clark said he has yet to come across any religious signage about Islam, Judaism or Hinduism.

“How unique would that be? Clark said, adding that if he saw an atheist sign he would remove it. “It would be hypocritical not to.”

“Our responsibility to act”

“I don’t know how Jews, Muslims, Hindus or atheists are supposed to feel welcome in Los Angeles if the only religious signs they see are Christian signs on the freeways,” he added. . “If the city does not remove these signs, we feel it is our responsibility to act.”

Signs and banners, regardless of content, are not permitted on bridges, fences and posts on California state highways, said Michael Comeaux, a public information officer with the California Department of Transportation. known as Caltrans.

“Such signs and banners could be a distraction to drivers, which would raise a safety issue,” Comeaux said, adding that Caltrans is removing signage regardless of the content of the messages.

In Los Angeles, signs on the public right-of-way are illegal and city officials will remove any posted to the Office of Street Services, a division of the Department of Public Works, a city official said.

A woman taking calls to the 311 call centre, which connects residents to non-emergency city services, said people should not put up or remove signs on the public right-of-way. The city’s Investigations and Enforcement Division handles requests to remove illegal signs.

City discourages illegal signs

Illegal signs, according to the city’s website, “create the same negative perception of a community as graffiti or other forms of vandalism.” Nails and tacks placed on utility poles to place illegal signs also put lineworkers at risk of serious injury, the city said.

When it comes to religion, the city is “very neutral”, the city official added. “Our city is multicultural and therefore there are many religions that are practiced here.”

Arlene Ríos, vice president of the board of directors of Atheists United, finds religious signage on overpasses annoying, not least because “here in Los Angeles, we’re usually stuck in traffic jams and we spend a lot of time in our cars”. She said people shouldn’t feel “guilty” for believing in Jesus.

“Sometimes I wonder, when I see the ‘Jesus is the answer’ (sign), ‘Jesus is the answer to what? What is Jesus? said Ríos, who helps arrange get-togethers with other non-religious Latinos in Southern California’s San Gabriel Valley.

On a recent Saturday, Clark and Christine Jones – chair of the board of directors of Atheists United – met at the group’s Los Angeles office in the regional building of the Center for Inquiry – a nonprofit organization that champions science and critical thinking in the examination of religion – to plan driving route to remove the signs they followed.

The duo made their first stop at the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Alvarado Street, where they easily pulled up two signs quoting John 14:6 that were attached to a pole, no ladder needed.

From there, they drove about a mile to remove the sign nailed to the utility pole near the 101 freeway, then headed to East LA to remove a sign that said “Jesus is eternal life” from an upper deck. Along the way, they removed and recorded other unexpected religious signs they encountered.

The “Jesus is Eternal Life” sign on the highway bridge was more difficult to remove because it was wedged between two fences. Clark and Jones slid the panel down until they were able to remove it. It was their last sign of the day, putting together a handful of signs in about two hours.

“We preserve both public and secular spaces so that they are welcome for all,” Clark said. “The only way for us to truly have freedom of religion is to also have freedom of religion.”

This content is written and produced by Religion News Service and distributed by The Associated Press. RNS and AP join forces on certain religious news content. RNS is solely responsible for this story.

]]>
Blade is accepting applications for summer scholarships https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/blade-is-accepting-applications-for-summer-scholarships/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 14:55:02 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/blade-is-accepting-applications-for-summer-scholarships/ The Comings & Goings section is about sharing the professional successes of our community. We want to recognize those who land new jobs, new customers for their business, joining boards of directors, and other accomplishments. Please share your successes with us at: [email protected]. Congratulation to Jonathan Lovitz on the occasion of his appointment to the […]]]>

The Comings & Goings section is about sharing the professional successes of our community. We want to recognize those who land new jobs, new customers for their business, joining boards of directors, and other accomplishments. Please share your successes with us at: [email protected].

Congratulation to Jonathan Lovitz on the occasion of his appointment to the board of directors of the LGBTQ+ Real Estate Alliance. Upon his appointment, he said, “My life’s work has been dedicated to helping the American Dream be within reach of every American in every community. I am honored to continue this work as a board member of the LGBTQ+ Real Estate Alliance, helping to make homeownership and safe communities an essential part of the economic empowerment we seek in our communities. I look forward to bringing my years of public policy experience to advancing the important work of the Alliance and fighting for its stakeholders as I continue my journey to the Pennsylvania State House this year. For more information, visit LovitzforPA.com.

Before starting his campaign, Lovitz was senior vice president of the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce. He currently serves the Chamber as a public policy consultant. Lovitz is the co-creator, with Jason Evans, of PhillyVoting.org, an organization that recognizes that traditional, in-person methods of promoting voter registration and polling information are challenging during COVID-19. He was director in New York of the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce; Acting Director of Communications and Executive Director, StartOut; and Director of Media and Communications and Senior Producer and News Anchor with Network Global Communications, Inc. Lovitz is a regular guest on MSNBC, CNBC, NPR, and Bloomberg, among others, and has served as a keynote speaker for the U.S. Department of Defense . , United States Department of the Treasury, United Nations, The Trevor Project and Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS.
Lovitz received her Bachelor of Acting (Summa Cum Laude) from the University of Florida.

Marc Rupp

Congratulations also to Marc Rupp, who has been named Director of the Adaptation Program at the Georgetown Climate Center. Rupp will lead the GCC adaptation team, providing strategic direction for its work in support of resilience, equity, and community solutions at the local, state, and federal levels. GCC Executive Director Kate Zyla said, “Mark brings extensive experience working at all levels of government on policies that protect people, communities and ecosystems. Representing Washington State, Mark served on the first advisory council of state officials that informed the founding of GCC in 2009 to provide a voice for the state in the development of federal policy and legislation. on climate and energy.

Accepting the position, Rupp said: “While we work to reduce greenhouse gas pollution, it is crucial to address the increasingly severe climate impacts facing communities – especially underserved communities. and frontline – face today. GCC has a phenomenal record of supporting states and communities in the face of these challenges. I am thrilled to join such an accomplished team to continue to provide decision makers at all levels of government with the tools they need to build resilience in the fabric of communities across the country.

Prior to joining GCC, Rupp was director of state policy and federal affairs with the Environmental Defense Fund. Prior to that, he had a distinguished career in public service, including: Deputy Associate Administrator for Intergovernmental Relations, US Environmental Protection Agency; and director of the DC office of former Washington Governor Gregoire. He served as legislative counsel to U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.).

]]>
Inside the fight for banks to benefit their communities • Sacramento News & Review https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/inside-the-fight-for-banks-to-benefit-their-communities-sacramento-news-review/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 16:53:06 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/inside-the-fight-for-banks-to-benefit-their-communities-sacramento-news-review/ As banks continue to merge, advocates are trying to ensure low-income communities won’t have to pay for it. By Robin Urevich, Capital & Main This story is produced by award-winning journalism association Capital & Main and co-published here with permission. At a time when big banks are easily getting approval for profitable mergers, some California […]]]>

As banks continue to merge, advocates are trying to ensure low-income communities won’t have to pay for it.

By Robin Urevich, Capital & Main

This story is produced by award-winning journalism association Capital & Main and co-published here with permission.

At a time when big banks are easily getting approval for profitable mergers, some California community groups say it’s not so fast. Dozens of them are seeking to block US Bank’s bid to acquire Union Bank unless the former earmarks $90 billion for charitable loans and donations to low-income areas and communities of color of State.

The $8 billion merger, announced Sept. 21, 2021, would create California’s fifth-largest bank, a $680 billion mega-corporation that would compete with giants like Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase. How the Biden administration responds to the merger will be a test of whether the administration intends to consider bank consolidation rather than rubber-stamp it.

In a July 2021 executive order, President Biden called for a more critical approach to merger approvals, noting that “excessive consolidation increases costs for consumers, limits credit for small businesses, and hurts low-income communities.” “.

The merger would be a win for bank executives, but Paulina Gonzalez-Brito, executive director of the Oakland-based California Reinvestment Coalition, made up of local housing advocates and nonprofit development groups, is leading the opposition to the merger. ‘acquisition. According to Gonzalez-Brito, low-income communities have a lot to lose from this deal.

So far, US Bank and Union Bank have each provided financing for affordable housing. Each lends to individuals and small businesses, donates to local charities and community lenders.

“Now the danger is that we will disappear. You end up with less than you started with and communities get less,” Gonzalez-Brito noted.

Much of the $90 billion package proposed by the CRC would go toward one of the state’s greatest needs: housing. The California Housing Partnership reports that 1.2 million low-income renters lack safe and affordable housing.

The California Reinvestment Coalition is calling for public merger hearings to be held in Los Angeles, Fresno and San Francisco. Among CRC’s proposals: special programs to boost home ownership among African Americans and small Native American businesses. Additionally, they are asking for smaller-scale opportunities for tenants like Maria Montes de Oca to own and manage their own buildings.

* * *

In Oakland, just before Christmas 2021, Montes de Oca and a handful of neighbors were celebrating. Its landlord, who she said had doubled the rent for the past two years while refusing to eradicate mold or fix backed-up plumbing, had tentatively agreed to sell her building to the Oakland Community Land Trust.

“Now I can relax,” Montes de Oca said, as after a two-year rent strike, the land trust promises to keep the building affordable and make repairs, i.e. to say if the case passes.

Oakland Community Land Trust executive director Steve King said he plans to reconcile funding from the City of Oakland and nonprofit lenders to purchase the building from Montes de Oca.

CRC says the $90 billion benefits package would ensure low- and moderate-income communities of color get housing and small business financing opportunities and mitigate the potential damage of a consolidation.

But such agreements are not legally binding and enforcement can be difficult. “It’s usually a hard thing to do,” said Mike Calhoun, president of the Washington, DC-based Center for Responsible Lending. “They will say they will make X dollars in loans. It is often unclear whether this is beyond what they have done. How do you count eligible loans? »

In New York, Kathryn Franco, president of the Buffalo Niagara Reinvestment Coalition, said that to help enforce the agreements, her group tries to make sure the public is part of the process by “being really transparent with the information we have. have, [and] let community members know.

* * *

The American bank, for its part, argues that its acquisition of Union Bank is in itself a benefit to the communities where it operates, and promises in its October 2021 merger filing to provide affordable and increased financial access, to “address systemic racism” and to support “sustainable environmental practices”. It is also noted in the merger application that both banks passed their latest Community Reinvestment Act exams with an “Outstanding” rating.

Under the Community Reinvestment Act, which aims to eliminate lending discrimination by banks, regulators periodically review each bank’s lending and community investment record, assigning ratings ranging from unsatisfactory to outstanding. But grade inflation is rampant, Gonzalez-Brito said, with 96% of banks passing their exams.

Banks often agree to community benefit agreements in order to weed out opposition and grease the shoes for mergers to proceed. The CRC secured 12 such deals by calling on regulators to deny bank mergers and acquisitions based on poor community reinvestment performance. But a $90 billion commitment from the U.S. bank would be the biggest in California yet.

Yet the whole process, from merger announcement to concessions made to community groups to eventual consolidation, is more akin to Kabuki theater than transparent regulatory scrutiny, because bank mergers – at least over the past 15 years – have been virtually guaranteed approval.

In 2019, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) removed all doubt by forcing Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell to publicly admit that since 2006 the Fed had approved 3,813 mergers and denied none.

But that can change. After President Biden issued his executive order last July, the DOJ and FDIC signaled that they would take a closer look at their merger approval rules.

California Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), who chairs the House Financial Services Committee, called on regulators to rein in the US Bank-Union Bank deal and other pending mergers that would create banks with more $100 billion in assets until federal agencies draft new regulations.

Echoing the Reinvestment Coalition’s call for public merger hearings, Waters wrote in a December 2021 letter to federal regulators that evidence “has shown that bank consolidation is hurting small business lending, financial inclusion, financial stability and the rights of workers in financial institutions”.

In its opposition to the merger, the CRC drew attention to the US bank’s branch closures in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color. The group cited a study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition which showed that US Bank closed a quarter of its 643 California branches between 2017 and 2020. The CRC fears that the consolidation could lead to additional closings, which would encourage more people turning to high-cost check cashing and payday loans.

The bank’s lending record also shows that racial disparities persist for borrowers in California, despite its better CRA score.

In 2020, US Bank declined just 24% of loan applications from white areas, compared to 30% of applicants from predominantly African American neighborhoods and nearly 38% from predominantly Latino communities.

The data, derived from banking disclosures to federal regulators, also shows that in 2020, about 38% of Californians lived in majority-white communities, with roughly the same percentage in majority-Latino neighborhoods. But 56% of the bank’s loan applicants were white and only 16.1% were Latino.

* * *

American bank spokesperson Jeff Shelman argued in an email to Capital & Main that the bank’s “loan underwriting and approval processes have been carefully designed with fair lending requirements in mind.” He pointed to $37 million in charitable donations and $1.3 billion in community development investments, such as a newly constructed 98-unit apartment building in San Bernardino County or a motel conversion to affordable housing in Anaheim. . Shelman didn’t say the bank wouldn’t be closing branches, but he said, “We won’t leave any community that Union Bank currently serves and we’re committed to keeping all front-line branch employees.”

But the CRC insists that the banks put their commitments in writing. Gonzalez-Brito said Bank of America officials had held at least two “listening sessions” with his group, but so far no real negotiations.

“I’m surprised how slowly they’re moving,” she says, adding that the community groups she works with are getting nervous.

Now, with more critical merger reviews on the horizon, groups like CRC and New York State’s Buffalo Niagara Reinvestment Coalition may have greater leverage, and banks may be willing to spend more. for the communities in order to consolidate.

“I hope there will be a real change in the way banks approach mergers,” said Kathryn Franco of the Buffalo coalition.

Copyright 2022 Capital & Main

]]>
At the heart of the fight for banks to benefit their communities https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/at-the-heart-of-the-fight-for-banks-to-benefit-their-communities/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 16:45:19 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/at-the-heart-of-the-fight-for-banks-to-benefit-their-communities/ At a time when the big banks getting easy approval for profitable mergers, say some California community groups, not so fast. Dozens of them are seeking to block US Bank’s bid to acquire Union Bank unless the former earmarks $90 billion for charitable loans and donations to low-income areas and communities of color of State. […]]]>

At a time when the big banks getting easy approval for profitable mergers, say some California community groups, not so fast. Dozens of them are seeking to block US Bank’s bid to acquire Union Bank unless the former earmarks $90 billion for charitable loans and donations to low-income areas and communities of color of State.

The $8 billion merger, announced Sept. 21, 2021, would create California’s fifth-largest bank, a $680 billion mega-corporation that would compete with giants like Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase. How the Biden administration responds to the merger will be a test of whether the administration intends to consider bank consolidation rather than rubber-stamp it.

In a July 2021 executive order, President Biden called for a more critical approach to merger approvals, noting that “excessive consolidation increases costs for consumers, limits credit for small businesses, and hurts low-income communities.” “.


The $8 billion merger would create California’s fifth-largest bank, a $680 billion mega-corporation that would compete with giants like Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase.



The merger would be a win for bank executives, but Paulina Gonzalez-Brito, executive director of the Oakland-based California Reinvestment Coalition, made up of local housing advocates and nonprofit development groups, is leading the opposition to the merger. ‘acquisition. According to Gonzalez-Brito, low-income communities have a lot to lose from this agreement.

So far, US Bank and Union Bank have each provided financing for affordable housing. Each lends to individuals and small businesses, donates to local charities and community lenders.

“Now the danger is that we will disappear. You end up with less than you started with and communities get less,” Gonzalez-Brito noted.

Much of the $90 billion package proposed by the CRC would go toward one of the state’s greatest needs: housing. The California Housing Partnership reports that 1.2 million low-income renters lack safe and affordable housing.

The California Reinvestment Coalition is calling for public merger hearings to be held in Los Angeles, Fresno and San Francisco. Among CRC’s proposals: special programs to boost home ownership among African Americans and small Native American businesses. Additionally, they are asking for smaller-scale opportunities for tenants like Maria Montes de Oca to own and manage their own buildings.

* * *

In Oakland, just before Christmas 2021, Montes de Oca and a handful of neighbors were celebrating. Its landlord, who she said had doubled the rent for the past two years while refusing to eradicate mold or fix backed-up plumbing, had tentatively agreed to sell her building to the Oakland Community Land Trust.

“Now I can relax,” Montes de Oca said, as after a two-year rent strike, the land trust promises to keep the building affordable and make repairs, i.e. to say if the case passes.

Oakland Community Land Trust executive director Steve King said he expected to secure funding from the City of Oakland and nonprofit lenders to purchase the building from Montes de Oca.


US Bank argues that its acquisition of Union Bank is in itself a benefit to the communities where it operates and promises to provide affordable and increased financial access.



CRC says the $90 billion benefits package would ensure low- and moderate-income communities of color get housing and small business financing opportunities and mitigate the potential damage of a consolidation.

But such agreements are not legally binding and enforcement can be difficult. “It’s usually a hard thing to do,” said Mike Calhoun, president of the Washington, DC-based Center for Responsible Lending. “They will say they will make X dollars in loans. It is often unclear whether this is beyond what they have done. How do you count eligible loans? »

In New York, Kathryn Franco, president of the Buffalo Niagara Reinvestment Coalition, said that to help enforce the agreements, her group tries to make sure the public is part of the process by “being really transparent with the information we have. have, [and] let community members know.

* * *

The American bank, for its part, argues that its acquisition of Union Bank is in itself a benefit to the communities where it operates, and promises in its October 2021 merger filing to provide affordable and increased financial access, to “address systemic racism” and to support “sustainable environmental practices”. It is also noted in the merger application that both banks passed their latest Community Reinvestment Act exams with an “Outstanding” rating.

Under the Community Reinvestment Act, which aims to eliminate lending discrimination by banks, regulators periodically review each bank’s lending and community investment record, assigning ratings ranging from unsatisfactory to outstanding. But grade inflation is rampant, Gonzalez-Brito said, with 96% of banks passing their exams.


In 2019, Senator Elizabeth Warren forced Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell to publicly admit that since 2006 the Fed had approved 3,813 mergers and denied none.



Banks often agree to community benefit agreements in order to weed out opposition and grease the shoes for mergers to proceed. The CRC secured 12 such deals by calling on regulators to deny bank mergers and acquisitions based on poor community reinvestment performance. But a $90 billion commitment from the U.S. bank would be the biggest in California yet.

Yet the whole process, from merger announcement to concessions made to community groups to eventual consolidation, is more akin to Kabuki theater than transparent regulatory scrutiny, because bank mergers – at least over the past 15 years – have been virtually guaranteed approval.

In 2019, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) removed all doubt by forcing Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell to publicly admit that since 2006 the Fed had approved 3,813 mergers and denied none.

But that can change. After President Biden issued his executive order last July, the DOJ and FDIC signaled that they would take a closer look at their merger approval rules.

California Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), who chairs the House Financial Services Committee, called on regulators to rein in the US Bank-Union Bank deal and other pending mergers that would create banks with more $100 billion in assets. until federal agencies draft new regulations.

Echoing the Reinvestment Coalition’s call for public merger hearings, Waters wrote in a December 2021 letter to federal regulators that evidence “has shown that bank consolidation is hurting small business lending, financial inclusion, financial stability and the rights of workers in financial institutions”.


In 2020, US Bank refused only 24% of loan applications from white areas, compared to 30% of applicants from predominantly African-American neighborhoods.



In its opposition to the merger, the CRC drew attention to the US bank’s branch closures in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color. The group cited a study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition which showed that US Bank closed a quarter of its 643 California branches between 2017 and 2020. The CRC fears that the consolidation could lead to additional closings, which would encourage more people turning to high-cost check cashing and payday loans.

The bank’s lending record also shows that racial disparities persist for borrowers in California, despite its better CRA score.

In 2020, US Bank declined just 24% of loan applications from white areas, compared to 30% of applicants from predominantly African American neighborhoods and nearly 38% from predominantly Latino communities.

The data, derived from banking disclosures to federal regulators, also shows that in 2020, about 38% of Californians lived in majority-white communities, with roughly the same percentage in majority-Latino neighborhoods. But 56% of the bank’s loan applicants were white and only 16.1% were Latino.

* * *

American bank spokesperson Jeff Shelman argued in an email to Capital & Main that the bank’s “loan underwriting and approval processes have been carefully designed with fair lending requirements in mind.” He pointed to $37 million in charitable donations and $1.3 billion in community development investments, such as a newly constructed 98-unit apartment building in San Bernardino County or a motel conversion to affordable housing in Anaheim. . Shelman didn’t say the bank wouldn’t be closing branches, but he said, “We won’t leave any community that Union Bank currently serves and we’re committed to keeping all front-line branch employees.”

But the CRC insists that the banks put their commitments in writing. Gonzalez-Brito said Bank of America officials had held at least two “listening sessions” with his group, but so far no real negotiations.

“I’m surprised how slowly they’re moving,” she says, adding that the community groups she works with are getting nervous.

Now, with more critical merger reviews on the horizon, groups like CRC and New York State’s Buffalo Niagara Reinvestment Coalition may have greater leverage, and banks may be willing to spend more. for the communities in order to consolidate.

“I hope there will be a real change in the way banks approach mergers,” said Kathryn Franco of the Buffalo coalition.



Copyright 2022 Capital & Main

]]>
Murphy’s rule could lead to group home shortages https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/murphys-rule-could-lead-to-group-home-shortages/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 09:08:31 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/murphys-rule-could-lead-to-group-home-shortages/ Warning of severe staffing shortages, advocates for New Jerseyans with disabilities are urging Gov. Phil Murphy to revoke the vaccination mandate he issued last week for community-vital group home workers. Murphy on January 19 signed a executive order requiring healthcare workers to be fully vaccinated and fortified against COVID-19 or face dismissal. The executive order […]]]>

Warning of severe staffing shortages, advocates for New Jerseyans with disabilities are urging Gov. Phil Murphy to revoke the vaccination mandate he issued last week for community-vital group home workers.

Murphy on January 19 signed a executive order requiring healthcare workers to be fully vaccinated and fortified against COVID-19 or face dismissal. The executive order eliminates a testing alternative that home providers say has helped them retain staff at a time when the latest coronavirus surge has thinned ranks.

Operators who run group homes, assisted living facilities and other programs that serve tens of thousands of people with developmental disabilities said they understand the importance of vaccination. But the new mandate is very scary.

“There are no staff. Day programs are closed. People need to stay home,” said Valerie Sellers, CEO of the New Jersey Association of Community Providers, one of three trade groups that represent more than 150 agencies in the state. “Families are angry with agencies because they have to work. But if they don’t have staff, they can’t open programs.”

]]>
Oregon election officials reject proposed ballot measure for school choice https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/oregon-election-officials-reject-proposed-ballot-measure-for-school-choice/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 15:37:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/oregon-election-officials-reject-proposed-ballot-measure-for-school-choice/ Oregon Secretary of State Shemia Fagan on Wednesday rejected a petition seeking a school choice measure in the November 2024 ballot because it was not issue-specific. The proposed measure included changes to the Oregon Constitution that would allow parents to choose any school for their child and provide public funding for students home-schooled or in […]]]>

Oregon Secretary of State Shemia Fagan on Wednesday rejected a petition seeking a school choice measure in the November 2024 ballot because it was not issue-specific.

The proposed measure included changes to the Oregon Constitution that would allow parents to choose any school for their child and provide public funding for students home-schooled or in private schools, including those that provide a Religious education.

The petition came from Education Freedom for Oregon, a Tualatin-based nonprofit, and Marc Thielman, superintendent of the Alsea School District, located about 30 miles southwest of Corvallis. Theilman, who lives in Cottage Grove is also a Republican candidate for governor.

Thielman filed the petition on September 29, 2021, with 1,776 signatures along with written statements of support from three people.

Reed Scott-Schwalbach, president of the Oregon Education Association and Jim Green, executive director of the Oregon School Boards Association, delivered remarks through a lawyer opposing the measure.

Fagan said in a statement that she rejected the measure because it violated the state’s “single topic rule,” which requires ballot initiatives to address a single subject, topic or issue. By asking for changes to school funding laws and laws prohibiting state funding of religious education, the petition was actually seeking to change several constitutional laws, she wrote.

Donna Kreitzberg, executive director of Education Freedom for Oregon, wrote in an email that the group’s leaders were disappointed with the decision and intended to appeal.

Thielman said he was “really upset” that Fagan didn’t call him to explain his decision and accused her of “inserting his own political biases.”

Oregon Capital Chronicle is a nonprofit subsidiary of States Newsroom, a national 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization supported by grants and a coalition of donors and readers. The Capital Chronicle maintains complete editorial independence, which means that news and coverage decisions are made by Oregon reporters for Oregonians.

]]>
HTI launches new program with $7.3 million grant https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hti-launches-new-program-with-7-3-million-grant/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 22:02:28 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hti-launches-new-program-with-7-3-million-grant/ PRINCETON, NJ – The Hispanic Theological Initiative (HTI) is proud to announce that a $7.3 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. will support the creation of a new program to help master’s students discern and navigate their way to doctoral studies. The grant, awarded to Princeton Theological Seminary, one of the HTI Consortium member schools […]]]>

PRINCETON, NJ – The Hispanic Theological Initiative (HTI) is proud to announce that a $7.3 million grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. will support the creation of a new program to help master’s students discern and navigate their way to doctoral studies. The grant, awarded to Princeton Theological Seminary, one of the HTI Consortium member schools and its housing institution, also allows HTI to provide scholarships for pre-thesis doctoral students, create more collaborative internships with non-profit organizations nonprofit in the ecology of theological and religious education. , and more. HTI’s program, titled “In conjunction! Strengthening the Recruitment, Retention, and Graduation of Latinx Masters and Doctoral Students,” will outline a five-year scholarship programming and support plan to reinforce HTI’s mission and vision of supporting doctoral students, Latinx graduates and mid-level teachers. the academy, the church and the world.

“We are thrilled to receive this substantial grant as HTI enters 2022,” said HTI Executive Director, Reverend Joanne Rodríguez. “This grant honors HTI in conjunction working with its founders, mentors, faculty, editors, staff, partner institutions, and 24 consortium chairs and deans. It is a testament to the innovative work and collaborative value of the HTI Consortium and its growing legacy. The grant creates more spaces for HTI to advance its holistic approach to nurturing and preparing Latinx doctors to serve in this new pandemic time and post-pandemic world.

“This grant complements the vital work that HTI has done over a quarter of a century. The HTI community and I could not be more grateful to Lilly Endowment for their insightful and visionary leadership,” said Reverend Rodríguez. HTI’s proposal was born out of many conversations with many partners, and in response to identified needs in conjunction with all 64 HTI Fellows at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. During this time, HTI also shifted its programming to virtual formats. Programming and in-person events are expected to gradually return with safety measures in place.

“HTI’s commitment to ensuring the graduation of Latinx scholars (93% and average time to graduation of 5.5 years) and helping them thrive as scholars, church leaders, and nonprofit administrators are needed more than ever. Institutions are working to realign their operational structures and educational vision to prepare a diverse cohort of agile, collaborative, and justice-focused leaders. These Latinx leaders will continue to transform the academy, the church, and the world. HTI has the experience, cumulative knowledge and community connections to walk alongside partner institutions as we shape diverse futures in conjunctionsaid Reverend Rodríguez.

“Princeton Theological Seminary’s doctoral program has benefited from the high caliber of Hispanic Theological Initiative programming and support for decades,” said Mr. Craig Barnes, President of Princeton Theological Seminary. “With this grant, HTI will continue its vital work to support early-career scholars and encourage gifted students to embark on their studies with the financial support and mentorship that will allow them to thrive. Princeton Theological Seminary is proud to be a partner in HTI’s work, and we look forward to the exciting opportunities that will arise from this investment in HTI’s mission.

In a testimonial on HTI’s 25and anniversary, celebrated last year, Dr. Frank Yamada, executive director of the Association of Theological Schools (ATS), said, “HTI responds to a current and future critical missionary need for theological schools. This is a growing need in ATS schools because what we know from our ATS enrollment data is that the only places where there is growth among students and students newly enrolled students are among students of color. Additionally, Dr. Mary Elizabeth Moore, Professor and Dean Emeritus of Boston University School of Theology, shared that “HTI is needed. The predominantly white theological schools were not able to do this alone. They needed the kind of intensity, support, vision, embrace that HTI gave its scholars, and the kinds of relationships that HTI helped build across the Americas.

In its first 25 years, HTI has helped 150 Latinx scholars earn doctoral degrees and provided professional development and scholarships to several master’s students and postdoctoral fellows. HTI graduates serve in seminaries and universities as teachers and administrators across the United States and in six other countries, as well as in ministerial and nonprofit leadership positions. In conjunction with institutional partners and individual investors, HTI looks forward to advancing its impact in the larger ecology of theological and religious education.

About the Hispanic Theological Initiative
The Hispanic Theological Initiative is a unique partnership with 24 doctoral granting institutions whose mission is to cultivate Latinx doctoral degrees for leadership positions in academia, the church, and the world. With the support of the 24 consortium member institutions, HTI seeks to increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of Latinx doctoral students across the country; increase the presence of Latinx leaders and teachers—especially tenured professors in seminaries, theological schools, and universities; and provide a forum for the exchange of information, ideas, and best practices to engage the contributions of Latinx faculty and students and amplify diverse voices and perspectives within the Latinx community and beyond. . Established in 1996, HTI is a mentorship, networking, and fellowship program that addresses the critical issue of advancing Latinx research and leadership in the theological and religious landscape for the betterment of academic and church communities across the world. Learn more at www.htiprogram.org.

###

Contact:
Rev. Joanne Rodriguez
Hispanic Theological Initiative
609-252-1736
[email protected]

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Religion News Service or Religion News Foundation.

]]>
San Antonio College will not buy Hughes House from the Archdiocese https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/san-antonio-college-will-not-buy-hughes-house-from-the-archdiocese/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 23:12:05 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/san-antonio-college-will-not-buy-hughes-house-from-the-archdiocese/ San Antonio College backed out of talks with the Archdiocese of San Antonio to purchase the century-old Hughes House. Neighbors and conservationists hope the ruling means the stately home at 312 W. Courtland Place will not be demolished. In a letter dated Jan. 7, SAC President Robert Vela told area residents that the college “has […]]]>

San Antonio College backed out of talks with the Archdiocese of San Antonio to purchase the century-old Hughes House.

Neighbors and conservationists hope the ruling means the stately home at 312 W. Courtland Place will not be demolished.

In a letter dated Jan. 7, SAC President Robert Vela told area residents that the college “has no intention of becoming involved” in the demolition of the 110-year-old home adjacent to the campus north of downtown.

]]>
Lawsuit alleging child sexual abuse filed against Archdiocese of Denver https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/lawsuit-alleging-child-sexual-abuse-filed-against-archdiocese-of-denver/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 12:11:49 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/lawsuit-alleging-child-sexual-abuse-filed-against-archdiocese-of-denver/ [ad_1] At least one lawsuit alleging child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy has been filed in Colorado following the passage of a new law last year. Colorado resident Brian Barzee sued the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Denver on Monday alleging sexual exploitation and abuse by a former priest while at St. Andrew’s Preparatory Seminary in […]]]>


[ad_1]

At least one lawsuit alleging child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy has been filed in Colorado following the passage of a new law last year.

Colorado resident Brian Barzee sued the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Denver on Monday alleging sexual exploitation and abuse by a former priest while at St. Andrew’s Preparatory Seminary in Denver. Barzee’s complaint was filed under Senate Bill 21-88, which passed last year and came into effect on January 1.

Under the new law, survivors of child sexual abuse for whom the civil statute of limitations has already expired have three years to sue their abusers and the public or private institutions that have turned a blind eye to the abuse.

RECEIVE MORNING TICKETS IN YOUR INBOX

Colorado law previously required survivors to sue for child sexual abuse within six years of their 18th birthday. But the SB-88 created a new way for people already over the age of 24 to sue for incidents that began as early as 1960.

“It is only because of this new law that each of us will one day have a voice against our violators,” Barzee said at a press conference in November, announcing his intention to press charges once. the law entered into force. He was joined by his lawyer, Michael Nimmo of Denver.

Left to Right: Plaintiffs Meg Hargett and Brian Barzee; their lawyer, Michael Nimmo; and Brie Franklin, Executive Director of the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, attend a press conference at the Hyatt Regency Denver Tech Center on November 18, 2021. (Faith Miller / Colorado Newsline)

The alleged perpetrator was named in the report

Father James Moreno, who was named in Barzee’s trial, has been identified in a December 2020 Report released by the Colorado Attorney General’s Office following an earlier October 2019 report detailing child sexual abuse by Roman Catholic clergy.

According to the report, Moreno allegedly sexually assaulted a boy in 9th grade in college after a substantial amount of grooming – a term used to describe the manipulative behavior used by sex offenders to gain access to a victim – during the boy’s first year in St. Andrew’s Seminary Preparatory High School. Before the anonymous victim was 18, Moreno allegedly assaulted him more than 60 times. The alleged abuses described in the Attorney General’s report occurred from 1978 to 1980.

Moreno’s abuse of Barzee, meanwhile, is believed to have occurred from 1978 to 1982. Barzee claims Moreno sexually assaulted him hundreds of times. As part of his grooming of Barzee, Moreno would give him “special treatment” and take him to see movies, on fishing and camping trips, and on trips to Camp Saint Mallow in Estes Park, according to the lawsuit. At the time, Moreno was working as a spiritual director for St. Andrew’s.

Moreno’s alleged abuse included fondling Barzee’s genitals, forcing him to perform oral sex on Moreno, and forcible rape of Barzee with other unidentified priests. The lawsuit also claims that Moreno gave Barzee alcohol, marijuana and sedatives.

“Father Moreno established, supervised and participated in activities and programs involving underage children enrolled in St. Andrews, and engaging with underage children was an integral part of his job,” the lawsuit said. “Therefore, he was an adult placed in a position of responsibility, trust and supervision of minors registered at St. Andrew’s.”

In late 2019, the unidentified victim of abuse described in the Attorney General’s 2020 report contacted the Independent Reconciliation and Reparations Program established by the Three Catholic Dioceses of Colorado. The IRRP – which paid compensation to eligible victims of child sexual abuse – was created in October 2019the same month, the Colorado attorney general’s office released its original report on clergy sexual abuse.

In addition to this reparations program, which was in effect from 2019 to 2020, the Archdiocese of Denver also funded a reparations program from 2006 to 2008, according to spokesperson Mark Haas.

“Even though the most recent official program has ended, the Archdiocese is committed to continuing to work with all who have come forward, and we have,” Haas wrote in an email. The two programs paid compensation to a total of more than 115 victims who received an average of $ 142,000 each, Haas said, adding that the amount of compensation varied depending on the circumstances.

Haas declined to make a statement about Barzee’s trial until the Archdiocese finished considering it.

After the victim described in the Attorney General’s 2020 report submitted information about Moreno through the IRRP, Moreno admitted to the sexual abuse, according to the report – which noted that the Attorney General’s office was not aware of ‘no evidence proving Moreno’s guilt. The Archdiocese of Denver reported the abuse to law enforcement and began the process of secularizing Moreno. Moreno had already retired medically from the priesthood 16 years earlier, the report notes.

The archdiocese has permanently suppressed Moreno’s faculties, which means he cannot celebrate Mass, hear confessions or perform other priestly ministries anywhere in the world, Haas said in an email.

“Secularization implies that the Vatican officially declares that he is no longer a priest,” Haas explained. This process is still ongoing for Moreno, although Haas noted that the difference between suppressing Moreno’s faculties and secularizing him is not particularly noticeable to the general public.

The trial describes the abuses committed by several priests

The archdiocese adopted a policy of sexual misconduct in 1991, Haas said. The policy included “mandatory reporting to the police, education and training required for all staff and volunteers serving youth, background checks and survivor support,” according to one. page on his website which Haas led Newsline.

But in the late 1970s and early 1980s, Barzee’s trial claims that at least six other St. Andrew’s priests were aware of Moreno’s alleged abuse of Barzee and other boys. Two of the people named in the lawsuit, Fathers James Rasby and John Holloway, were included in the attorney general’s report.

“Many of these people were not only aware of the abuse, but aided Father Moreno in the abuse or participated in the abuse themselves,” the complaint states.

According to Barzee’s trial, the Archdiocese “knew that the priests and brothers of the Catholic Church and the Archdiocese, under their supervision and control, prepared, assaulted and sexually abused children”, had not taken “Reasonable steps” to protect children; and “actively covered up” the abuse.

The main entrance to the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on Colfax Avenue in Denver on December 21, 2020 (Quentin Young / Colorado Newsline)

Barzee’s trial accuses a second priest, who was not mentioned in the original 2019 Attorney General’s report or the 2020 Supplementary Report, of sexual abuse. In or around 1979, Barzee alleges that Moreno took Barzee to Camp Saint Mallow while several other priests were staying there. Moreno reportedly took Barzee to the second priest’s bedroom, where that priest stroked Barzee’s genitals, and then brought Barzee back to Moreno’s bedroom, according to the lawsuit.

In 1982, Barzee alleges that Moreno told Barzee that they were going on a trip together to Brush. Barzee went to the second priest and begged him not to force Barzee on the trip, according to the lawsuit.

The priest “told Mr Barzee that if he did not make the trip he would be expelled from St. Andrews and the Catholic Church,” the complaint says. “Sir. Barzee made the trip to Brush with Father Moreno, where Father Moreno again forcibly raped Mr. Barzee.

The clock is ticking for survivors of child sexual abuse a long time ago

Under SB-88, child sexual abuse survivors for whom the statute of limitations has expired must prosecute before 2025. The final version of the bill was sponsored by Sens. Jessie Danielson, a Democrat from Wheat Ridge, and Rhonda Fields, a Democrat from Aurora. , with Representatives Dafna Michaelson Jenet, a Democrat from Commerce City, and Matt Soper, a Republican from Delta. Governor Jared Polis enacted SB-88 in July.

The new law includes certain limits on the amounts that can be paid in damages to plaintiffs who file child sexual abuse claims. For private institutions, the limit is $ 1 million.

A tax analysis of SB-88, updated in August, estimated that the state would pay $ 2.71 million in damages over each of the next five years to those who sued the agencies under SB-88 state and youth programs.

A related bill that was also passed last year aimed to provide more opportunities for recent and future child sexual abuse survivors to hold their abusers and the institutions that employed them accountable. Senate Bill 21-73 removed the civil statute of limitations for survivors under 24 on Jan. 1 and for future child sexual abuse survivors in Colorado. Danielson and Senator Don Coram, a Republican from Montrose, sponsored the SB-73, along with Representatives Michaelson Jenet and Soper.

[ad_2]

]]>
Texas conservatives praise SCOTUS decision on Senate Bill 8 as abortion rights groups condemn decision https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/texas-conservatives-praise-scotus-decision-on-senate-bill-8-as-abortion-rights-groups-condemn-decision/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 22:52:30 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/texas-conservatives-praise-scotus-decision-on-senate-bill-8-as-abortion-rights-groups-condemn-decision/ [ad_1] One hundred days after the law came into effect, the Supreme Court on Friday issued a ruling on the Texas six-week abortion ban that was far from clear: Texas cannot waive its ban, known as Senate Bill 8, under federal court consideration. by outsourcing the execution to individuals, but the law remains in force, […]]]>


[ad_1]

One hundred days after the law came into effect, the Supreme Court on Friday issued a ruling on the Texas six-week abortion ban that was far from clear: Texas cannot waive its ban, known as Senate Bill 8, under federal court consideration. by outsourcing the execution to individuals, but the law remains in force, at least for now.

As reactions to the court ruling poured in, President Joe Biden said “while it is encouraging that the court has ruled that part of the vendor trial may continue, this ruling reinforces the fact that it remains still a lot of work to do – in Texas, Mississippi and many states across the country where women’s rights are currently under attack. “

“Today’s decision is an attempt to undo – in terms of what’s going on in Texas in particular and the country – 50 years of precedent,” Vice President Kamala Harris said Friday. “And as far as I am concerned and as far as our administration is concerned, a woman’s right to make decisions about her own body is non-negotiable.”

Representatives of the Republican state welcomed the court’s decision. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton called the decision “another victory on the books!”

“BIG VICTORY !! The Biden v Texas case has been sent out of court !! This morning’s SCOTUS decision leaves SB8 in effect, ”Paxton tweeted on Friday. “I will continue to defend #Texas law and FIGHT FOR LIFE !!! ”

Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, who helped lead SB 8 in the legislature, tweeted: “Texas is a solidly #anti-abortion State, and I will never stop fighting to protect the innocent lives of the radical left from abortionists. A great victory for unborn children!

State Senator Bryan Hughes, R-Mineola, who wrote SB 8 and even traveled to Washington for oral argument on November 1, said that “leaving the Texas Heartbeat Act in place today , the Supreme Court affirmed two fundamental conservative principles: the sanctity of life and the sovereignty of States.

“It’s a total victory for life, and it’s long overdue” Hughes tweeted.

“The Supreme Court basically struck down Roe today. While some may think the abortion providers won, they haven’t, ”said Texas House Rep. Briscoe Cain, R-Deer Park. “Today’s opinion is in fact a total victory for the pro-life movement. It is a full rationale for the law enforcement mechanism and sets a roadmap for other states to do the same.

Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz said the court ruling was a “victory for Texas and the pro-life movement.”

“Today the Supreme Court has largely left in place a Texas law that protects life and sends the message that every life is valuable,” Cruz said in a statement.

Texas Democrats, however, were quick to condemn both the court’s decision and the Texas lawmakers behind SB 8.

The point is that Greg Abbott, Dan Patrick and the Texas Republicans are denying millions of Texas women their constitutionally guaranteed right to health care, while allowing strangers to bring frivolous and damaging lawsuits against them. abortion providers, ”said Texas Representative Michelle Beckley, D. -Carrollton.

Opponents of SB 8 ring the bell

Abortion rights advocates criticized the judges’ decision to ultimately leave SB 8 in effect and warned that the decision sets a dangerous precedent not only for future abortion rights violations, but also for violations. other constitutional rights, such as firearms and voting rights.

“The implications of today’s decision will be profound,” said Marc Hearron, the attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights who argued on behalf of clinics and providers in Texas in Jackson’s oral arguments. “Today’s ruling means that any state can prohibit the exercise of any constitutional right within its borders if it allows the ban to be enforced through private prosecution.”

“By allowing SB 8 to remain in force, the Supreme Court continues to fail millions of Texans,” said Sheila Katz, CEO of the National Council of Jewish Women. “These decisions open the floodgates for mimic laws attacking our constitutional rights, including access to abortion, freedom of speech, religious freedom and the right to marry whomever we want.”

The American Medical Association weighed in on the decision, calling SB 8 “blatant legislative violence that endangers lives and interferes with the practice of medicine.”

“Every day that Texas law remains in effect, it negatively impacts reproductive health and shared medical decision-making, the cornerstone of the patient-physician relationship,” said Dr. Gerald E. Harmon, president of WADA.

Amy Hagstrom Miller, President and CEO of Whole Woman’s Health and Whole Woman’s Health Alliance – the Texas abortion provider who was the lead plaintiff in the SB 8 case the court ruled on, Whole Woman’s Health vs. Jackson – said “Texans deserve better than this.”

“No one should be forced to leave their home country and travel hundreds of miles because anti-abortion politicians made it impossible for them to get care in their own community,” said Hagstrom Miller .

Since the law came into effect, abortions in Texas have been reduced by 50%, causing many people to travel out of state to obtain legal abortions. But the vast majority of people seeking an abortion cannot actually travel out of state, Hagstrom Miller said.

“They are invisible right now,” she said. “The majority of our patients cannot even entertain this idea. “

“The Supreme Court’s failure to end Texas’ six-week abortion ban jeopardizes the health and well-being of Texans, including those forced to cross the borders of the State to receive essential care, ”said Royce Brooks, executive director of the Progressive Texas Defense Organization. Annie’s List.

Julia Kaye, a lawyer with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project, said that after today’s ruling, it is time for Congress to pass federal law guaranteeing abortion rights across the country.

“We urgently need the Senate to pass and pass the Women’s Health Protection Act,” Kaye said, referring to a bill in Congress that would cement Deer vs. Wade protections in federal law. The House passed the law in September, and Biden said on Friday he would continue to work with Congress to pass the bill.

“We also need the Food and Drug Administration to remove its outdated and unnecessary restrictions on medical abortion in order to expand access to safe and effective abortion care where possible,” Kaye said.

The Food and Drug Administration has undertaken a serious review of the accessibility of medical abortion and a decision is expected on December 16. In a status report, the FDA said it would complete its review of whether or not to waive the waiver in person. requirements.

“Today the majority won a narrow victory for Whole Women’s Health but, as Justice Sotomayor pointed out, reproductive autonomy and religious freedom cannot be protected state by state,” said Katy Joseph, director of policy and advocacy for the Interfaith Alliance, a national interfaith organization.

Supporters of the new law applaud the decision

Meanwhile, supporters of SB 8 celebrated the High Court’s decision to keep the law in place as heard in lower courts.

“The Texas Right to Life celebrates that the Texas Heartbeat Act will continue to save between 75 and 100 unborn children from abortion per day. The success of our efforts is embodied in each individual life that is saved, ”said Kimberlyn Schwartz, director of media and communications for Texas Right to Life.

In a statement from the Texas Alliance for Life, the organization notes that “neither the United States Supreme Court nor the state’s district court has considered the constitutionality of a ban on abortion prior to viability, only procedural questions linked to the citizen application of SB 8 ”.

“Whether or not the courts allow this law to continue, we hope the Supreme Court will overturn the terrible Roe v Wade precedent so that states can fully protect unborn babies from the abortion tragedy. This could happen by next June, when the Court decides on the Dobbs case, whose oral arguments they heard last week, ”said executive director Joe Pojman.

“We are grateful that this law continues to save lives as legal challenges against it end up in lower courts,” said Kristen Day, executive director of the national anti-abortion organization Democrats for Life of America.

On December 1, judges heard arguments in Dobbs vs. Jackson, a Mississippi case that seeks to overthrow Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 Dallas County case in which the Supreme Court struck down a Texas law criminalizing abortion and recognized a woman’s right to terminate a pregnancy until the fetus is viable outside the womb . A decision in this case is still pending.

Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the national “pro-life” group Susan B. Anthony List, reacted to Friday’s decision with hopes that Dobbs will overthrow Deer vs. Wade.

“We are celebrating that the Texas Heartbeat Act will remain in effect, saving the lives of unborn children and protecting mothers as litigation continues in lower courts. Meanwhile, we look forward to the court ruling in the Dobbs case in which the court directly examines the constitutionality of laws that protect unborn children and mothers before viability. Dobbs presents the greatest opportunity in generations to modernize our laws, ”she said.

“[Dobbs] is the perfect opportunity for the Court to rectify its overriding error and reverse Roe v. Wade, putting once and for all on hold the illogical, unjust and immoral notion that the Constitution guarantees the right to maliciously kill our youngest citizens, ”said Lila Rose, Founder and President of Live Action.

Austin correspondent Allie Morris contributed to this report.


[ad_2]

]]>