catholic church – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 13:04:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T154232.929.png catholic church – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ 32 32 China begins processing licenses for online religious activities https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/china-begins-processing-licenses-for-online-religious-activities/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 11:51:19 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/china-begins-processing-licenses-for-online-religious-activities/ Chinese authorities have started issuing licenses for online religious services in accordance with the “Measures for the Administration of Internet Religious Information Service” which was jointly adopted by the Ministry of State Security and other agencies last year. March 18, 2022 A surveillance camera seen near a religious painting during mass at Xishiku Cathedral, a […]]]>

Chinese authorities have started issuing licenses for online religious services in accordance with the “Measures for the Administration of Internet Religious Information Service” which was jointly adopted by the Ministry of State Security and other agencies last year.

March 18, 2022

A surveillance camera seen near a religious painting during mass at Xishiku Cathedral, a state-sanctioned Catholic church, on Christmas Eve in Beijing, China, December 24, 2019. (Photo by Florence Lo/ Reuters)

BEIJING: Chinese authorities have started issuing licenses for online religious services in accordance with the “Measures for the Administration of Internet Religious Information Service” which was jointly adopted by the Ministry of State Security and other agencies last year.

The ban on unauthorized online religious activity went into effect on March 1, cutting off many house churches from a “crucial resource in their ability to preach the gospel,” according to the International Christian Concern (ICC) group.

Religious groups seeking to conduct online activities, such as streaming or publishing sermons, must first obtain a religious information service license on the Internet.

Organizations or individuals are also prohibited from fundraising online “in the name of religion.”

Several provinces announced that they were already enforcing the ban and requiring permits to hold religious services.

In Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces, the Ethnic and Religious Affairs Committee said any person or organization that intends to engage in online religious services must apply for a permit.

The notice indicates that the committee will make a decision to approve or deny the application within 20 days.

“The relevant formalities shall be processed in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Measures for the Administration of Religious Information Services on the Internet within 6 months from the effective date,” said notices issued in several provinces the last week.

He said that a “training course for internet religious information examiners” will soon be organized to facilitate the work of applicants and “effectively improve the examination ability of religious information examiners.”

The training module includes religious policies and regulations, Internet religious information service management measures, anti-cult knowledge, anti-terrorism knowledge, Internet religious affairs, basic knowledge of various religions and issues related to the application for a religious information service license on the Internet.

The ICC earlier said the measures “represent a direct attack on much of China’s informal and unregulated religious activity.”

He said many house churches in China operate outside of sanctioned religious organizations commissioned by the Chinese government’s SARA, either the Three Self-Patriots Movement (TSPM) or the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association (CPA).

Christian churches that operate outside of these organizations have been severely harassed by Chinese authorities, the ICC said.

He said religious activity online will now be more closely monitored by Chinese authorities, which will make operating a house church or an unsanctioned church “much more dangerous”.

The group said the measures “will also impact state-sanctioned churches, as their authorized status puts them at the forefront of government surveillance online.”

“This is extremely concerning given the already strict guidelines that religious clergy must follow, including the promotion of national unity, love of country and love of party from the pulpit,” the ICC said.–licas.news

]]>
What the Western Church can learn from the Eastern Rite https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/what-the-western-church-can-learn-from-the-eastern-rite/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 14:14:38 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/what-the-western-church-can-learn-from-the-eastern-rite/ In my early twenties, my faith life was in a rut. I regularly attended Mass, but felt frustrated by elements of most Roman Catholic parishes I attended: rushed prayers, irrelevant homilies, and distracting folk music. I participated, but maybe not wholeheartedly. I was drawn to the Latin Mass, which I appreciate for the solemnity and […]]]>

In my early twenties, my faith life was in a rut. I regularly attended Mass, but felt frustrated by elements of most Roman Catholic parishes I attended: rushed prayers, irrelevant homilies, and distracting folk music. I participated, but maybe not wholeheartedly. I was drawn to the Latin Mass, which I appreciate for the solemnity and humility of the priest facing the altar, the sacred sound of Gregorian chant, and the devotion of the congregations dedicated to it. These people took catechesis and attendance at Mass seriously, actively participating with their missals and standing in long lines for confession. But it wasn’t until I attended a Melkite Greek Catholic church, with roots in the ancient Orthodox church of Antioch, that I found traditions and devotions that gripped my heart as well as a new language for praising God.

When I first entered the Byzantine Church for the Sunday Divine Liturgy, all my senses were immediately engaged, and my attention was maintained until the liturgy ended an hour and a half later. There was barely a moment of silence. New to the traditions but gradually understanding their meaning, I followed the example of the other parishioners.

As I entered the nave, I lit a candle in the narthex in front of the icons of Christ and the Virgin Mary Theotokos (God-bearer), declaring my presence to God and giving my particular prayer intentions. The sung psalms of Orthos (Morning Prayer) drew me into the liturgy, along with the clinking of the censers and the flow of incense as the deacons incensed the whole church and congregation. My view was filled with golden and colorful icons. Saints and angels surrounded me, and the dome above showed Christ Pantocrator (Almighty) at its peak. While traditional Western churches wow you with high ceilings and long naves, making you feel small and drawing your gaze up and forward to the altar, Eastern churches tend to be smaller, shaped domed and circular, making you feel surrounded by the triumphant church and part of the dome of heaven and earth.

Many Byzantine churches do not even have pews. People moved around, prayed before the icons of their patron saints, greeted each other and received the Sacrament of Reconciliation in front of the iconostasis (the screen separating the altar from the congregation). The priest gave absolution by holding his stole above the heads of the penitents. When the epistle and the gospel were to be read, the deacon pleaded: “Let us be attentive! At dozens of moments during the liturgy, the faithful made the sign of the cross – each time the names of the persons of the Trinity or of the Theotokos were sung, whenever a blessing was given by the priest, or simply whenever an individual strongly felt a particular prayer intention.

I was struck by how the Catholic faithful of the Byzantine rite showed such respect for the Eucharist. Many people have not gone up to commune; it is considered essential to adhere to the prescribed weekly fast of Wednesday and Friday and to abstain from animal products, to have examined one’s conscience and to be in a state of grace. Everyone bowed and made the sign of the cross as each gift was carried to the altar. These gifts themselves came from the sacrifice of the community. The bread was baked by a parishioner and marked with the special seal of the parish. All the communicants shared this same bread. The songs of the choir and the priest intensified until the epiclesis when the Holy Spirit was called upon the gifts. I was surprised that the Eucharist was leavened bread, which the priest dipped in the precious blood and placed on my tongue. With regard to the sacred mystery, many people sprinkled the Eucharist with blessed but unconsecrated bread to ensure that every particle of Christ’s body and blood had been worthily consumed.

Advertising

When I first received the body and blood of Christ in the Byzantine Church, tears came to my eyes as the priest said, “The servant of the Lord, Nigel, receives the body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins and eternal life. The priest’s statement sounded like a stark reminder of the power of the Eucharist to forgive sins and grant eternal life, something I easily overlooked with the simpler “Body of Christ” being said in the West. Moreover, hearing my name, I had the impression that Christ himself was calling me.

At the end of the liturgy, all attendees were invited to take more holy bread—antidoron (“instead of gifts”) – like a meal of fellowship and love and sharing it with loved ones who couldn’t come to church. It serves as a visible sign of the blessings of attending the Eucharistic service and an invitation to church life.

I pray that healing and reunification between our churches can be achieved.

The Roman Catholic Mass in my home parish will always be a place of deep connection, history, familiarity and comfort, but I now find more affinity with the Byzantine Rite. I feel comfortable with the theological overtones of Eastern Christianity, not always developing strict formulas of how God works through the sacraments, but remaining in awe of the sacred mysteries.

Another accent of Eastern Christianity that resonates strongly with me is Jesus’ prayer: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner. It’s so simple and yet so fundamental that I can tell it as I breathe in and out, over and over again. Where Roman Catholics have the Rosary and its complex sequence of prayers and meditations, Byzantine Catholics have prayer cords, each knot inviting another Jesus prayer to be said. For Eastern Christian mystics, the constant repetition of this prayer is central to their meditative practice. For me, often distracted, anxious or dwelling on the past, the accessibility and depth of the Jesus Prayer turns my heart to continual renewal and greater trust in God.

Advertising

By entering into the routine of attending a Byzantine parish, each Sunday I feel more deeply immersed in an ancient tradition in which I can spend my whole life trying to participate more. Most of my fellow Catholics will not know this expression of Christianity, but there are many ways to be Catholic. Finding the deeper essence of our church in a different expression of faith that Eastern Catholics share with Eastern Orthodox, I pray that healing and reunification between our churches can be achieved. There is room for diversity within a church with universality in its name. With two traditions nourishing my soul, I feel as I imagine the Holy Pope John Paul II when he said, “The Church must breathe with both lungs!”


A direction

There were several doctrinal splits in the church Jesus founded: the Great Schism of 1054, which separated the Eastern Orthodox (the main church of Greece, Russia and Eastern Europe) and the Catholics, and the earlier schisms, which separated the Eastern Orthodox (centered on Armenia, Ethiopia, Egypt and the Levant) and the Church of the East (that of Iraq, Iran and ‘India). Over the centuries, many groups within these churches returned to communion with the Bishop of Rome, representing five distinct rites in 23 churches sui iuris (“of his own accord”) of the Catholic Church, the most important being the Ukrainian, Maronite, Melkite, and Syro-Malabar churches. Roman Catholics can participate fully in the sacraments of any of these 23 churches. Progress has been made over the past century in easing tensions between Rome and the Orthodox Churches, with mutual anathemas lifted and declarations of faith shared.


This article also appears in the March 2022 issue of US Catholic (Vol. 87, No. 3, pages 45-46). Click here to subscribe to the magazine.

Image: Flickr.com/Andrew Gould

]]>
Catholic Church properties could be used to house Ukrainian refugees https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/catholic-church-properties-could-be-used-to-house-ukrainian-refugees/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 15:54:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/catholic-church-properties-could-be-used-to-house-ukrainian-refugees/ The Catholic Church is investigating whether its properties could be used to house refugees fleeing war in Ukraine. Archbishop Eamon Martin, the Catholic Primate of All Ireland, said on Wednesday that “in all our parishes we have invited our parish pastoral councils and our financial councils and priests to consider whether there are any properties […]]]>

The Catholic Church is investigating whether its properties could be used to house refugees fleeing war in Ukraine.

Archbishop Eamon Martin, the Catholic Primate of All Ireland, said on Wednesday that “in all our parishes we have invited our parish pastoral councils and our financial councils and priests to consider whether there are any properties which we could make available to Ukrainian families”.

This included unused school buildings and rooms, he said.

However, the Archbishop said these were “in the early stages of defining the scope” and initial contact had been made with the relevant government department.

“I think that in the days and weeks to come there will be a lot of activity on the ground” with the parishes “in the front line”.

He said the church was “modeling what we hope our parishioners would also do in their own homes” and that he was exploring “a possibility” of offering accommodation in his own residence. “I wish I could bring somebody in,” he said.

Speaking alongside Archbishop Martin, the Church of Ireland Primate of All Ireland, Archbishop John McDowell, said he had registered to host a refugee under the scheme sponsorship from the British government and encouraged parishioners to do the same.

He said the Church of Ireland would also review its vacant properties, but the “focus” would be on clergy homes.

“By far the number of properties owned by churches are those that are inhabited by clergy and others and this is by far the quickest and most direct route to providing housing for people,” a- he declared.

In their joint annual St. Patrick’s Day message, delivered in Armagh on Wednesday, the archbishops said they were “deeply troubled and saddened” by the war in Ukraine and the ongoing humanitarian crisis and called for an immediate ceasefire.

They offered prayers for the people of Ukraine and praised the “encouraging” support given to its people from across Ireland.

Cross-border cooperation

Speaking to reporters afterwards, the archbishops sharply criticized the response of the UK government, which they say should be as ‘equally generous’ in welcoming refugees as Ireland and other EU countries. .

Ireland has a temporary directive in place to allow Ukrainians to move around the EU as EU citizens, while the UK has a more complex visa-based system.

Both archbishops said they believed “more could be done” by the UK government, and Archbishop McDowell said he would “urge them to do more now”.

“The Home Office is not a notoriously sympathetic department and may struggle to deal with these issues, but we would certainly urge them to do as much as other countries in the European Union have done and to do it with good grace and good heart and do it quickly,” he said.

“We have to be realistic,” Archbishop Martin said. “There are going to be a lot of people who will need our help, so by appealing to the UK government in Westminster we are also indirectly appealing to our own Assembly and the executive here to look at ways to find a free movement of persons seeking refuge in Northern Ireland.

“I think the UK may have said, let’s think about the bureaucracy and see how many doors we can open. It’s the wrong way.

“I really think that where there is a humanitarian catastrophe of this magnitude in Europe, it is incumbent on all of us to respond generously and urgently as needed,” he said.

The two church leaders also called for full north-south cooperation on issues such as access to interpreters, schools and teachers, and for Ukrainians to be allowed to cross the border without the need for checks. .

“This should become an urgent issue of cross-border cooperation,” Bishop Martin said.

]]>
In Putin’s worldview, a medieval narrative resurfaces https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/in-putins-worldview-a-medieval-narrative-resurfaces/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:27:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/in-putins-worldview-a-medieval-narrative-resurfaces/ The high-ranking priest of the Russian Orthodox Church, meanwhile, offered a very different reason for the invasion: gay pride parades. Still, experts say Kirill’s comments offer important insight into Putin’s broader spiritual vision of a return to a Russian empire, in which the Orthodox religion plays a central role. However, the tough stance of the […]]]>

The high-ranking priest of the Russian Orthodox Church, meanwhile, offered a very different reason for the invasion: gay pride parades.

Still, experts say Kirill’s comments offer important insight into Putin’s broader spiritual vision of a return to a Russian empire, in which the Orthodox religion plays a central role.

However, the tough stance of the Russian patriarch is also costing him supporters. The Russian Orthodox Church in Amsterdam announced on Sunday that it was cutting ties with the leader, just the latest in a number of priests and churches abandoning Moscow because of the war in Ukraine.

“Russian World”

“Putin put forward this concept of the so-called Russian world and this concept is grounded in Russian Orthodoxy,” Victoria Smolkin, associate professor of history at Wesleyan University, told CNN.

“The Russian world is wherever there are Russian speakers, the Russian world is wherever there is a Russian church – it does not recognize existing political boundaries,” Smolkin said.

Putin’s vision is supported by Kirill, who also views Ukraine as an integral and historic part of his Russian church, Georg Michels, a history professor at the University of California Riverside, told CNN.

“At the start of the war, Patriarch Kirill delivered a sermon in which he emphasized the God-given unity of Ukraine and Russia,” Michels said in a statement. Interview with UC Riverside News.

“Kirill exposed the ‘forces of evil’ in Ukraine who seek to destroy this unity,” Michels explained.

Last Sunday, Kirill went further during a sermon in Moscow when he specifically linked these “forces of evil” to gay pride events.

According to the patriarch, the war in Ukraine is about “a fundamental rejection of the so-called values ​​that are proposed today by those who claim world power”, i.e. the West.

The “test” of which side you are on, Kirill said, is whether your country is ready to hold gay pride parades.

“To get into the club of these countries, you have to organize a gay pride parade. Not to make a political statement, ‘we are with you’, not to sign agreements, but to organize a gay pride parade”, did he declare. said in the March 6 sermon.

“If we find violations of [God’s] law, we will never accept those who destroy that law, blurring the line between holiness and sin, let alone those who promote sin as an example or as one of the models of human behavior,” Kirill said. this subject today, there is a real war,” he added.

Kirill’s speech denounced the infiltration of Western liberal values ​​into the hearts and minds of what he said were historically unified and orthodox Ukrainian and Russian peoples.

“He says there’s a clash of civilizations and the gay pride parades in this narrative are a litmus test of which side you’re on,” Smolkin said.

Despite calls for Kirill to denounce Putin’s war, the “Russian Pope” not only refused to do so, but instead lent moral legitimacy to the invasion by calling it a struggle of “metaphysical significance”, of mankind choosing to follow the laws of God.

“The Russian Orthodox Church provides much of the symbolism and ideology that Putin used to cement his popularity,” Michels added.

Significance of Kyiv

The city of kyiv is highly symbolic for Putin and Kirill because of its connection to Vladimir I, a medieval ruler of Kievan Rus’ – a territory that included parts of present-day Ukraine and Russia – who converted to Christianity in about 988.

“According to the now dominant Russian nationalist view, Vladimir was the founding father of the first Russian state and of the Russian Orthodox Church. State and Church formed a productive symbiosis, and Kyiv (or Kyiv) became the cradle of Russian civilization,” wrote Michels. .

“Putin considers Vladimir the savior of Russia,” Michels told CNN. “For him, kyiv and Crimea, where Vladimir was baptized, are sacred Russian lands.”

The Christianization of Kievan Rus’ is the founding narrative on which Putin and Kirill claim Ukraine as part of Russia.

“They’re trying to wrest this legacy of Kievan Rus’ for Russia and it’s a really essential part of Putin’s view of history and the role of Russian Orthodoxy in that history,” Smolkin said.

“What Putin is claiming is that he is restoring the natural order of things given by God: that Ukrainians and Russians have always been one people and they all know it because they are all from Kievan Rus and that they are all Orthodox.”

Kirill’s speeches also reinforced this idea of ​​Western powers interfering with the historical unity of Russians and Ukrainians.

Russian Patriarch Kirill leads a Christmas service at the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow on January 6.

Three days after Russia invaded Ukraine, Kirill said in a speech: “We must not let dark and hostile external forces laugh at us, we must do everything to maintain peace between our peoples and at the same time protect our common historic homeland from all outsiders”. actions that can destroy this unit.”

Smolkin says Kirill’s rhetoric aims to show that the division between Ukrainians and Russians has been sown from outside.

She characterizes the Russian nationalist theory of the patriarch thus: “If the Ukrainians think that they are a different people from the Russians, it is only because they have been misled by the West which has sown discord between these brothers and harmonious sisters.

In 2016, after the invasion of Crimea, a monument to Vladimir was erected in central Moscow. Before that, the other great monument of Vladimir, erected in 1888, stood in the center of kyiv.

Trouble in the ranks

Kirill probably also supports Putin’s war as he recently lost power over several Ukrainian Orthodox churches.

The Ukrainian Orthodox Church has had special historical ties with the Russian Orthodox Church for centuries, a relationship which distinguishes it from other independent Orthodox Churches, such as those of Georgia, Cyprus, Greece, Romania and others which are part of Eastern Orthodox Christianity.

In 2018, following the invasion of Crimea, part of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church severed its ties with the Russian Orthodox Church, an act that angered the Russian Patriarch.

“For Patriarch Kirill,” Michels said, “it’s a matter of life and death.”

Since the start of the war in Ukraine, there are even more signs of growing discontent within the wider Orthodox ranks.

The Russian Orthodox Church in Amsterdam announced on Sunday that it was severing ties with Kirill and the Moscow Patriarchate over the latter’s stance on the war.

“This decision is extremely painful and difficult for everyone involved,” St. Nicholas of Myre Church in Amsterdam said. wrote on his site.

Some 300 Orthodox priests and deacons, many of whom live and work in Russia, also risked disobeying their leader and their country by publicly signing a letter calling for an immediate ceasefire.

“The Church is not a communist party that speaks only through its leader,” said Russian Orthodox priest Father Andrey Kordochkin, dean of St. Mary Magdalene Cathedral in Madrid and signatory of the letter. .

Kordochkin noted that the letter mentioned the word “war” four times; a word that is now illegal to print in Russian media.

“It’s an act of bravery,” he said, “especially for those who are physically in Russia, because we have families and are very vulnerable.”

“I am inspired by Russian exiles of the 20th century,” Kordochkin added. “I’m on a good list.”

The board of bishops of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, which is still linked to the Moscow Patriarchate, called on Kirill to ask the Russian government to stop the war.

A man lights a candle at an Orthodox church in kyiv, Ukraine on February 24.

“Your Holiness! We ask you…to call on the leadership of the Russian Federation to immediately end the hostilities that are already threatening to escalate into world war,” the bishops wrote in an open letter Feb. 28.

Another Ukrainian Orthodox leader, Metropolitan Epiphanius, whose church is independent of Moscow, had even stronger words.

“The spirit of the Antichrist is operating in the head of Russia,” he wrote in a February 27 statement. “That was Hitler in World War II. That’s what Putin has become today.”

In a significant act of distancing from Kirill, 12 Russian Orthodox dioceses in Ukraine removed his name from their prayers during the Divine Liturgy, on the instruction of their bishops.

Pope Francis

Pope Francis has so far refrained from calling on Kirill to condemn the war, and has not publicly condemned Putin or Russia by name, despite his fervent calls for an end to the war.

Other Catholic Church officials, however, are not so reluctant.

Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin quickly distanced the Catholic Church from Patriarch Kirill’s sermon demonizing gay pride parades, saying they risked “aggravating” the situation.

The president of the Polish Catholic Bishops’ Conference, Archbishop Stanislaw Gadecki, wrote a letter directly to Kirill, writing on March 2: “I ask you, brother, to call on Vladimir Putin to stop the senseless war against the Ukrainian people “.

He also asked Kirill to urge Russian soldiers to reject their orders, saying “refusing to follow orders in such a situation is a moral obligation.”

Father Antonio Spadaro SJ, a close adviser to Francis and editor of the semi-official Vatican and Jesuit newspaper “La Civilta Cattolica” expressed what many in the Catholic and Orthodox world are wondering at this time.

“The question of all questions is, what does Patriarch Kirill do and what will he do?” Spadaro said in an interview with Italian news agency Adnkronos last week.

This question, given Kirill’s statements so far, seems to have been amply answered.

]]>
New York woman, 68, was ‘beaten and raped inside a Catholic church by a homeless man’ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/new-york-woman-68-was-beaten-and-raped-inside-a-catholic-church-by-a-homeless-man/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 02:49:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/new-york-woman-68-was-beaten-and-raped-inside-a-catholic-church-by-a-homeless-man/ A New York woman, 68, was ‘beaten and raped inside a Catholic CHURCH by a homeless man who has already been arrested at least 30 times since the 1980s’ before being rescued by a “hero” priest A 68-year-old woman has filed a lawsuit against Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Manhattan and the Archdiocese of […]]]>

A New York woman, 68, was ‘beaten and raped inside a Catholic CHURCH by a homeless man who has already been arrested at least 30 times since the 1980s’ before being rescued by a “hero” priest

  • A 68-year-old woman has filed a lawsuit against Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Manhattan and the Archdiocese of New York over a 2019 rape case
  • The victim said authorities failed to provide adequate security at the church despite the presence of career criminal Craig Ellis, 55.
  • Ellis, who has 30 arrests on file, allegedly flashed older women in church before beating and raping the 68-year-old victim on January 30, 2019.
  • The assault ended when Reverend Gilberto Angel-Neri intervened, causing Ellis to flee the scene; he was arrested two hours later
  • Ellis’ case dates back to 1986 and includes a slew of charges of assault, public obscenity, forced touching and theft.

A 68-year-old woman was allegedly beaten and raped inside a Manhattan Catholic church by a homeless man who had been arrested 30 times since 1986, before being saved by a “hero” priest.

Career criminal Craig Ellis, 55, had attacked the unnamed woman inside the Hamilton Heights church on January 30, 2019, according to a lawsuit filed against Our Lady of Lourdes Church and the Archdiocese of New York.

The victim, identified only as “Jane Doe,” filed the lawsuit this week, claiming that Ellis was “known to church members and staff as a danger to the community” and that officials “n ‘had not taken reasonable security measures’, according to the New York Post reported.

NYPD officials said Ellis has 30 arrests on file, with the church attack being his last. His record dates back to 1986 and includes a slew of charges of assault, public obscenity, forced touching and theft.

The church and the Archdiocese of New York declined to comment on the legal issue.

A 68-year-old woman has filed a lawsuit against Our Lady of Lourdes Church and the Archdiocese of New York for allegedly failing to provide adequate security at the church despite the presence of career criminal Craig Ellis, who was accused of attacking and raping the woman in 2019

According to the lawsuit, the Ellis beat and raped the woman until the Reverend Gilberto Angel-Neri (pictured) intervened, causing the suspect to flee  Ellis was arrested a few hours later

According to the lawsuit, the Ellis beat and raped the woman until the Reverend Gilberto Angel-Neri (pictured) intervened, causing the suspect to flee Ellis was arrested a few hours later

The lawsuit, which was filed in Manhattan Supreme Court for unspecified damages, said the elderly victim approached the church at night when she noticed the doors were open but the lights were on. extinct.

The victim said he was suddenly attacked by Ellis, an infamous church figure who is said to have flashed older women before.

The lawsuit says he covered her mouth, took her to the bathroom, locked them both inside, and beat her with his fist and slammed her against the wall.

“At that time, the attacker scammed [her] clothes and raped her.

The attack ended around 10 p.m. when Reverend Gilberto Angel-Neri entered the church, causing the victim to scream for help as Angel-Neri ran to the scene while Ellis fled, according to the trial.

Ellis was arrested hours later with the victim’s jacket and cellphone at the ready.

He was charged with assault, attempted sexual assault and theft. He remains in police custody and is being held on $100,000 cash bond, the Post reported.

Ellis also underwent several psychiatric evaluations, the Post reported.

Angel-Neri could not immediately be reached for comment.

The lawsuit comes as the city continues to see an increase in rape and other violent crimes this year.

Although murders are almost the same with 67 committed so far this year compared to 66 last year, assaults have increased by more than 19%, from 3,210 to 3,824.

The number of gunshot victims rose from 181 cases to 215, more than 18% compared to the same period last year, and rapes increased by more than 31%, with 293 cases reported so far.

Robberies have seen the biggest spike so far this year, rising nearly 45% from the same period in 2021.

Overall, crimes increased by more than 47%.

Advertising

]]>
St. Thomas School, Glen Mills Welcomes Archbishop – Catholic Philly https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/st-thomas-school-glen-mills-welcomes-archbishop-catholic-philly/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 16:44:24 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/st-thomas-school-glen-mills-welcomes-archbishop-catholic-philly/ Join the CatholicPhilly.com family CatholicPhilly.com works every day to strengthen the bonds between people, families, and communities by spreading the information people need to know about the Catholic Church, especially in the Philadelphia area, and about the world in which we live. Through your donation, regardless of the amount, you and hundreds of others are […]]]>

Join the CatholicPhilly.com family

CatholicPhilly.com works every day to strengthen the bonds between people, families, and communities by spreading the information people need to know about the Catholic Church, especially in the Philadelphia area, and about the world in which we live.

Through your donation, regardless of the amount, you and hundreds of others are part of our mission to inform, train in the Catholic faith and inspire the thousands of readers who visit each month.

Here’s how you can help:

  • A donation of $100 allows us to feature award-winning photos of Catholic life in our neighborhoods.
  • A donation of $50 allows us to cover a current event in a local Catholic parish, school or institution.
  • A $20 donation provides us with powerful faith formation resources that can deepen your spirituality and knowledge of faith.
  • A small automated monthly donation means you can support us continuously and easily.

Won’t you consider giving a gift today?

Please join the church’s vital communications mission by donating any amount you can—a one-time gift of $40, $50, $100 or more, or a monthly gift. Your donation will strengthen the fabric of our entire Catholic community and maintain CatholicPhilly.com as a trusted source of information. Thank you in advance!

Make your donation by credit card here:

Or make your donation by check:
CatholicPhilly.com
222 N. 17th Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103

]]>
South Deerfield Ukrainian Church collects donations to send overseas https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/south-deerfield-ukrainian-church-collects-donations-to-send-overseas/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:58:53 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/south-deerfield-ukrainian-church-collects-donations-to-send-overseas/ Posted: 03/09/2022 17:49:17 Modified: 09/03/2022 17:48:44 SOUTH DEERFIELD — As supplies from Ukraine dwindle in the face of the continued Russian invasion, Andriy Krip has spent the past few days packing boxes full of supplies as part of his church’s community giving campaign, which has already yielded dozens and dozens of shipments ready to be […]]]>

Posted: 03/09/2022 17:49:17

Modified: 09/03/2022 17:48:44

SOUTH DEERFIELD — As supplies from Ukraine dwindle in the face of the continued Russian invasion, Andriy Krip has spent the past few days packing boxes full of supplies as part of his church’s community giving campaign, which has already yielded dozens and dozens of shipments ready to be sent to the beleaguered nation.

“We think we have to do something here,” Krip said between tape tears. “It’s hard to sit down and watch what’s going on.”

Krip is the priest at Descent of the Holy Spirit Ukrainian Catholic Church on Sugarloaf Street in South Deerfield and Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church in Ludlow, where he coordinates a donation drive to provide Ukraine with supplies medical supplies that will be used to treat injured soldiers, civilians and children.

Medical supplies the church is looking for include, but are not limited to, the following: first aid kits, tourniquets, bandages, petroleum jelly, burn gel, braces, tylenol, and ibuprofen. Non-medical supplies – which the church is asking to be separated from medical supplies – sought include foods like energy bars, crackers and pretzels, warm blankets, sleeping bags, socks, gloves, diapers, baby wipes and children’s clothing. Krip said churches do not accept adult clothing.

For a complete list of requested supplies, visit the Saints Peter and Paul Ukrainian Catholic Church website Facebook page at bit.ly/3MFm4g0.

Items can be dropped off at the Descent of the Holy Spirit Ukrainian Catholic Church at 44 Sugarloaf St. in South Deerfield.

The church is also asking for monetary donations to offset high shipping costs. Checks can be mailed to 44 Sugarloaf St., South Deerfield, MA 01373 or deposited in the church drop box. Krip asks that people notify the church at 413-583-2140 if they mail or deposit a check in South Deerfield because he is only there on Sundays. Alternatively, checks can be mailed to Ludlow Parish at 45 Newbury St., Ludlow, MA 01056.

On Tuesday, Krip said churches had “nearly 100 boxes” of supplies ready to be shipped to western Ukraine, where they will be distributed to various local groups treating injuries.

Krip said it’s “difficult to say on the timeline” when it comes to the end of the donation campaign, because it all depends on what the two churches can afford.

“It all depends on how much they need there in Ukraine and what we are able to do here with shipping costs,” Krip explained. “That’s why we collect cash donations.”

Krip himself has several family members who still live in the town of Zhokva, a small town about 20 miles north of Lviv, which has become something of a supply hub for resources from Western allies entering Ukraine. .

“They’re alive, there’s no bombing going on at their place right now,” Krip said. “We call them every day to make sure everything is fine; they have enough to survive.

He said shelves are empty across Ukraine as the humanitarian crisis worsens and any form of aid, even if it doesn’t arrive in the country for several weeks, will be of great benefit to those who suffer.

“It’s a complicated thing, but we know the need will be there for a while, even if the war stops,” Krip said. “That’s what happens after the war.”

]]>
Iconography and Healing of the Eyes of the Heart – Catholic World Report https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/iconography-and-healing-of-the-eyes-of-the-heart-catholic-world-report/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 21:22:30 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/iconography-and-healing-of-the-eyes-of-the-heart-catholic-world-report/ Detail of “Christ the Redeemer” (c. 1410) by Andrei Rublev [WikiArt.org] What does it mean to see God? Are there special places to look, or special ways to adjust our vision so that we can overcome our blind spots about God, or something else? I spent the fall of 1996 in traction in the hospital, […]]]>
Detail of “Christ the Redeemer” (c. 1410) by Andrei Rublev [WikiArt.org]

What does it mean to see God? Are there special places to look, or special ways to adjust our vision so that we can overcome our blind spots about God, or something else?

I spent the fall of 1996 in traction in the hospital, and the spring of 1997 learning to walk again after a near-fatal accident. So I had plenty of time to read, and that included sermons by St. Augustine of Hippo, one line of which stuck with me a quarter of a century later: “Our whole task in this life, dear brethren, is to heal the eyes of the heart so they can see God.

Thus, suggests the great Latin physician of North Africa, we can see God, but it will be a struggle to make it to the end. This, of course, is captured in Saint Paul’s famous phrase about how we see “through glass, in darkness,” but in the age to come we will see face to face.

What prevents us from having a clear vision now? Arguably, the greatest obstacle to seeing God clearly is our propensity for idolatry which, according to the Universal Catechism (no. 2113), “remains a constant temptation”.

In its wisdom, the Church knows that you cannot replace something (idols) with nothing and expect most people to be fine. Human weakness abhors a vacuum. Thus, instead of people and various objects that we tend to deify (“idolatry consists in deifying what is not God”, reminds us of this same paragraph of the catechism), the pastoral care of the Church l has historically led us to venture on icons.

Iconography is commemorated in the East at the start of Lent, the first Sunday of which is often called the triumph of Orthodoxy, commemorating the claiming of iconography after the Seventh Ecumenical Council at Nicaea in 787.

The conciliar decrees, ancient and modern, are invariably declarations of compromise, and the decrees of Nicaea II declaration about icons, because the Church was then torn apart by those who had already come a long way towards the abolition of all icons, which is why we have hardly any surviving images from the pre-iconoclastic period.

Substantially in the middle, with due caution and clearly aware of the risks they were running, but which they felt were safe because their decree reflected “the teaching of God of our holy fathers and the tradition of the Catholic Church“, and that this teaching “comes from the Holy Spirit,” the Nicene Fathers went on to “decree with all precision and care that” various pictures of christthe Theotokosangels and saints – including in mosaics and painted ones, on walls, panels, vestments and sacred instruments – were blessed and approved to function as models of holiness for the people.

How should the people treat these images, the danger of idolatry then as now being a universal temptation? The council again proceeds cautiously, advising us to give these images “respectful veneration. Surely it’s not complete worship [latria] in accordance with our faith, which is properly paid only to the divine nature. In other words, you can honor an image but never worship it.

Worship belongs to God alone. To adore an icon is to make it an idol at the same time. For some, the line between veneration and worship may not be entirely clear, but the Nicene Fathers felt it was a crucial distinction worth risking.

It leaves icons in an exposed and vulnerable position, however, and outbreaks of iconography were not confined to the Eastern Roman Empire in the 8th and 9th centuries. They will famously break out again during the Reformation, then in the West, according to Joseph Ratzinger’s great book The spirit of the liturgy at and after Vatican II in the Latin Church.

More recent scholarship has convincingly shown that iconoclasm – the deliberate destruction of images – is not limited to ancient and medieval Christianity or even “religion”. This is best illustrated in James Noyes’ invaluable 2016 study, The politics of iconoclasm: religion, violence and the culture of image disruption in Christianity and Islam. Using examples from Nazi Germany and communist Russia, he shows that the destruction of images, even so-called secular ones, is always the prelude to a new policy. (We see this playing out even now in Russian attacks on Kiev, which is an “icon” of Ukraine itself.)

The last quarter century, however, has brought about a massive revival of Christian iconography, with icons now found in many Protestant as well as Roman Catholic churches. I’ve been running for five years now an iconography camp for summer students, who come from afar and constantly love it. This year, by popular demand, we are organizing a workshop for adults alongside the students.

Icons are therefore (a dreaded phrase!) a “safe space” today for those struggling to see God. The Church has said that in them fallen matter (that is, us) contemplates redeemed and fully deified matter. Those we see were once what we are, struggling pilgrims here below, incomplete divinization.

In turn, as icons are often described as a window, they are able to not only see us, but also pray for us and encourage us to run the race to the end as we gather face to face around the table of God. In Hans Urs von Balthasar’s memorable image from his Trinity Sunday sermonwe learn that in “the Castle of the Three-in-One, the plan has always been that we, those who are wholly ‘others’, partake of the superabundant fellowship of life.”

May we use this Lent as a time to heal the eyes of our hearts to see and share with others the superabundant life that is offered to us now and in the age to come.


If you enjoy the news and opinion provided by Catholic World Report, please consider making a donation to support our efforts. Your contribution will help us continue to make CWR available to all readers around the world for free, without subscription. Thank you for your generosity!

Click here for more information on donating to the CWR. Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.


]]>
A statue outside the Catholic Church in Queens was almost stolen https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/a-statue-outside-the-catholic-church-in-queens-was-almost-stolen/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 02:14:44 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/a-statue-outside-the-catholic-church-in-queens-was-almost-stolen/ NEW YORK (1010 VICTORIES) — Police are looking for a man caught on surveillance video stealing a statue from the lawn of a Catholic church in Queens on Sunday. The man is seen on video picking up a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary from outside St. Gerard Majella Church in Hollis, removing it from […]]]>

NEW YORK (1010 VICTORIES) — Police are looking for a man caught on surveillance video stealing a statue from the lawn of a Catholic church in Queens on Sunday.

The man is seen on video picking up a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary from outside St. Gerard Majella Church in Hollis, removing it from the cave, putting it on his shoulder and standing escape.

Moments later, the man is filmed throwing the statue into the rectory garden after being dissuaded by a neighbor and a motion detector.

No damage was done to the statue.

Statue rejected in the garden of the presbytery

Photo credit Brooklyn Diocese

“Sunday morning as we started to open the church to welcome people to pray in a special way for world peace and blessings during this time of Lent, a disturbed person tried to steal our welcoming statue of Mother Mary, said Father Josephjude C. Gannon, Pastor of St. Gerard Majella. This incident is sad and a bit scary, but it is a lesson for all of us that even in these dark and scary times, God protects us. The light of Easter will always shine on us and Mother Mary will always guide us as individuals and as a community.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS.

]]>
Archdiocese of NO to welcome 249 worshipers to church this Easter – Clarion Herald https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/archdiocese-of-no-to-welcome-249-worshipers-to-church-this-easter-clarion-herald/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 03:56:15 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/archdiocese-of-no-to-welcome-249-worshipers-to-church-this-easter-clarion-herald/ By BETH DONZEBugle Herald Remembering the “love and kindness” shown by the Catholics he had met at university some four decades earlier, Bobby Sanson, 59, found himself drawn to Sunday Mass as a observer, receiving explanations on the liturgy from the two Catholic friends who accompanied him. him. That moving experience turned into a conversation […]]]>

By BETH DONZE
Bugle Herald

Remembering the “love and kindness” shown by the Catholics he had met at university some four decades earlier, Bobby Sanson, 59, found himself drawn to Sunday Mass as a observer, receiving explanations on the liturgy from the two Catholic friends who accompanied him. him.

That moving experience turned into a conversation with Father Tim Hedrick, pastor of St. Catherine of Siena Church in Metairie, about how Sanson – a lifelong Baptist – might one day convert to Catholicism.

“He gave me the report card and I signed up for the RCIA classes,” said Sanson, one of nearly 170 future Catholics attending the Sainte-Anne de Métairie church for the March 6 “Rite of election of catechumens and call for the continued conversion of candidates”. », a special welcome prayer service.

This year, 99 “catechumens” (people who are not yet baptized) and 70 “candidates” (already baptized Christians preparing for confirmation and the first eucharist) based on the South Bank publicly announced their decision to enter full communion with the Catholic Church – a journey that will culminate in the Easter Vigil Mass on April 16 in their respective parishes.

Catechumens will receive the sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and First Eucharist, while Candidates will receive Confirmation and First Eucharist.

As a sign of the will to become Catholic, each catechumen and candidate was called by name, presented by his godfather or godmother and welcomed individually by Bishop Gregory Aymond at the foot of the altar.

“It is always a very joyful day for us,” the Archbishop said, noting that each person’s faith journey was as individual as their fingerprint and had been guided by many family members, friends, catechists , clergy and religious.

Awaiting their reception of Baptism, Confirmation and the First Eucharist at the Easter Vigil, Bishop Aymond said the catechumens – who would be known as “the elect” after the prayer service – had actively responded to Jesus’ invitation to “come and follow me”. as disciples.


“The waters of baptism (which will be) poured over you by the priest will clothe you as a beloved daughter, a beloved son of God – all your sins forgiven,” he said, noting that their subsequent confirmation would imbue them with “the fullness of the Holy Spirit”, and their reception of the Eucharist would take place “at the family table”.

Addressing candidates – those already baptized people who are seeking full acceptance into the Catholic Church – Bishop Aymond offered his continued prayers for their decision to enter the Catholic Body of Christ.

“In this chapter of your history, you are preparing to make a profession of faith in the Catholic Church during the Easter Vigil,” he told them, encouraging catechumens and candidates to continue to pray, to study and become familiar with the teachings of the Church during the Lenten time of “retreat” leading up to Easter.

“As you move towards the Easter Vigil, stay close to the Lord,” Bishop Aymond said, echoing the words of the Gospel proclaimed minutes earlier. “He is the vine and you are the branches. Without him you can do nothing. Without him you cannot truly prepare to enter the church for a baptism or profession of faith.

The Archbishop, who will travel to the North Shore on March 7 to welcome 40 catechumens and 40 additional candidates to Covington’s Most Holy Trinity Church, said the total of 249 men, women and children entering the church this year marks an increase over last year.

“It is important to note that the church continues to grow,” he said. “The church continues to be more alive and vibrant because of (you).”

bdonze@clarionherald.org

]]>