Religious association – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 17:44:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T154232.929.png Religious association – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ 32 32 Humanists push for Do No Harm law in over 20 states in one day https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/humanists-push-for-do-no-harm-law-in-over-20-states-in-one-day/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/humanists-push-for-do-no-harm-law-in-over-20-states-in-one-day/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 17:16:28 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/humanists-push-for-do-no-harm-law-in-over-20-states-in-one-day/ “Can we count on your office to support the Do No Harm law this Congress?” “ This question (or a variation of it) was asked 50 times in July, as humanists across the country met with their members of Congress at the American Humanist Association’s biggest Lobby Day to date. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 […]]]>

“Can we count on your office to support the Do No Harm law this Congress?” “

This question (or a variation of it) was asked 50 times in July, as humanists across the country met with their members of Congress at the American Humanist Association’s biggest Lobby Day to date. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the event was held virtually, which made it even more accessible to our members who cannot make it to Washington, DC for a more traditional lobby day. .

Lobby Day by the numbers: 67 lawyers met with 50 congressional offices from 21 states (including DC).

But these numbers, while impressive, do not accurately reflect the impact AHA supporters have had. Humanists have passionately witnessed the harm religious discrimination has on their transgender neighbors and friends. They talked about strategy with members of Congress: what do we need to do to get this bill passed? What is the next step ? And how can we help in the district?

The AHA staff could not have achieved this feat alone. Our partners from American Atheists, the Secular Coalition for America, and the Freedom from Religion Foundation graciously offered their energy, time and expertise to help us.

But more importantly, the AHA could not have reached this elected number without humanist voters, who came from across the country, and rallied to meet their members of Congress to defend humanist values. Many were old hats at this, but most were first-time lawyers.

As a lobbyist in Washington, I have become adept at building coalitions, digging into policies, and building relationships with policy makers. But, aside from speaking with my own congressman (thanks to Free Thought Congressman Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton), I will always be at least a little short of effectively conveying what local voters are feeling on a question.

This is why lobby days are so important, and why they would be meaningless without AHA supporters. Humanist voters are the best advocates when it comes to sharing the impact of policies on the lives of the people our elected officials represent.

The bill we lobbied, the Do No Harm Law, would certainly have a positive impact on the lives of humanists.

In the years since the enactment of the Restoration of Religious Freedom Act (RFRA), we have seen individuals and organizations militarize the law for their own benefit, using religion as a sword against others rather than a shield as expected. The law was used by the former president to exempt federally funded foster placement agencies from federal regulations prohibiting discrimination, to allow for-profit companies not to provide employees with coverage. insurance that includes contraception, to justify blatant wage discrimination against female employees, and much more. .

The solution is the Do No Harm law. The bill, which already has more than 125 co-sponsors in the House of Representatives, would finally ensure that federal protections against discrimination do not play the second fiddle to religion. This crucial bill would restore the RFRA to its original intent and be a perfect signal that no one in this country can use their religious beliefs to circumvent long-established civil rights protections in employment, health care, service. audiences, etc.

To those who joined us: thank you very much for making this day such a success and, above all, for being incredible defenders of humanist values. And to our readers who were unable to attend this year: You can always help us build on our momentum by contacting your Congressional offices through our headquarters and urging them to support the Do No Harm Act and to invite them to join the free thought of Congress. Caucus.

Tags: AHA Annual Conference, Do No Harm


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Chad Blair: Ed Case attracts a challenger from the left https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/chad-blair-ed-case-attracts-a-challenger-from-the-left/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/chad-blair-ed-case-attracts-a-challenger-from-the-left/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 10:35:32 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/chad-blair-ed-case-attracts-a-challenger-from-the-left/ If you’re planning to run for Congress from Hawaii, here are some essential platform positions you may want to focus on: A livable minimum wage. Pro-work, pro-working class and pro-choice. Universal health care and universal pre-kindergarten. A path to citizenship to keep families together. A planet that is not destroyed by climate change. These are […]]]>

If you’re planning to run for Congress from Hawaii, here are some essential platform positions you may want to focus on:

A livable minimum wage. Pro-work, pro-working class and pro-choice. Universal health care and universal pre-kindergarten.

A path to citizenship to keep families together. A planet that is not destroyed by climate change.

These are some of the issues that Sergio Alcubilla described on his website, Sergio4Hawaii. “Husband, father, immigrant, poverty law chief / lawyer, community organizer and department head,” a recent tweet read.

Alcubilla – he pronounces al-coo-bill-ya – is a candidate for Hawaii’s 1st Congressional District, which encompasses the greater urban area of ​​Oahu. He possesses the kind of greedy idealism often exhibited in young candidates (he’s 42) when they first run for political office, before a few years of work can grind the edges.

But Alcubilla’s campaign faces two big challenges: Most people have never heard of him, making it difficult to raise funds and spread information. And the seat he’s running for is held by Rep. Ed Case, who says he’s seeking re-election.

Sergio Alcubilla and his family.
A recent tweet from Sergio Alcubilla.

“We’re just getting started and I know it’s an uphill battle,” says Alcubilla. “I know my rival will get commercial money and will probably overtake me. But it’s about going door-to-door and fighting for values. This race will not be about the money but about the people who care. I think it’s worth it. We will surpass Rep. Case.

In an email on Friday, Case confirmed he is running for re-election to the House and is welcoming challengers.

“I take no votes for granted and will work as hard as I can to once again earn the trust and support of my constituents for my continued service to Hawaii and to our country,” he wrote. “I look forward to a full campaign with all the naysayers who think they can do a better job.”

The congressman elected the ballroom Ed Case Dole Cannery.
Ed Case, elected Congressman, at the Dole Cannery Ballroom in 2018. Cory Lum / Civil Beat / 2018

Most political observers I know think Case will easily win another term.

“I would say her seat is secure,” says John Hart, professor of communications at the University of the Pacific in Hawaii. “I think he has obviously reached a kind of relaxation with those in the party who see him as a maverick – and I’m not talking about the gradual end of the party but the administrative end. So I don’t think he’ll get a challenge from that direction.

Hart continued, “But if progressives were successful in making waves, could the power structure reconsider? It would require a major change. Case is an outgoing Democrat from the state of Hawaii, and history indicates that they are doing extremely well. While some describe him as being to the right of his constituency, I don’t see a level of popular discontent with him outside of the progressive end.

Case, 69, faced no opposition in the 2020 Democratic primary and defeated his Republican opponent in a landslide.

But he made some local progressives unhappy with him. Last month, a group called Our Hawaii Action launched a six-figure media campaign to persuade the congressman to support President Biden’s $ 3.5 trillion Build Back Better plan.

Case is one of a handful of moderates “who have expressed doubts about the size of the budget deal and some of its more ambitious provisions which are supported by the left wing of the party,” as recently reported. writes my DC colleague Nick Grube.

Biden’s priorities

Case preferred that the House vote first on the $ 1,000 billion bipartisan infrastructure plan, which involves Republicans in the Senate. He supports Build Back Better but is worried about how he will be paid.

Now both plans are in limbo as Congress and the President attempt to strike a deal.

I don’t know how bad the BBB campaign will be, next August when the primary rolls around. But Alcubilla says Biden’s plan “is at the very heart of my campaign for Congress.”

As he explains on his website, “It will cut costs for working families and the elderly, lower taxes for our families with children, invest in our teachers and schools, and create new jobs to fight the climate change. By making the tax code fairer so that the richest companies and big corporations pay their fair share, we can finally take a step towards an economy that works for all of us, not just those at the top. “

Alcubilla also supports the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act (it’s stalled), the Green New Deal (ditto) and the Equality Act, which would amend the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity. in areas such as public housing and facilities and education (ditto again).

Alcubilla, married with two children who lives in Pauoa, was previously a lawyer and director of external relations at the Legal Aid Society of Hawaii. He received his law degree from the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaii.

He is a member of the board of directors of the Hawaii Philippine Lawyers Association and administrator of the Young Filipino Leaders Program. Most recently, he is a volunteer member of the sponsorship committee of the Hawaii Workers Center, a nonprofit organization that advocates for the rights of low-wage workers.

Born in Iloilo City, Philippines, Alcubilla immigrated to the United States at the age of 7 after his father – according to the candidate’s website – a military police officer, was murdered “by a Communist squad during the tumultuous period “of the people’s power revolution during the Marcos dictatorship. He eventually attended the University of Florida where he pursued a double major in political science and economics following the terrorist attack of September 11.

“A different path”

Her website says Alcubilla was inspired to complete seminary school and receive a master’s degree in religious education with a focus on interfaith and interfaith peace building.

What he doesn’t say is that it was at Unification Theological Seminary in New York, which was founded by Reverend Sun Myung Moon. Now deceased, Moon was a controversial figure, including a 1982 conviction and jail term in the United States for filing false federal income tax returns and conspiring.

When asked about UTS, Alcubilla describes it “as one of those things I did in my twenties. The idealization of youth.

After playing with a run for the Lieutenant Governor of Hawaii in 2022, Alcubilla switched to the CD1 race. His supporters include Tim Vandeveer, the former chairman of the Hawaii Democratic Party, and Gary Hooser, a former party vice chairman and former state senator who himself ran unsuccessfully for Congress and office. of the lieutenant governor.

“He has shown through his work in his life and his experience that he cares and is committed to workers, to the underprivileged, to families,” Hooser told me. “He could have chosen another path to earn money, to go to work for a big company or a big company, but he didn’t.

Hooser continued, “Congress, quite frankly, and all politics is full of people looking at the world through a lens of privilege. And Sergio looks at the world through the genuine lens of who he is – a childhood immigrant. , working families – and that’s refreshing You don’t have much more ground than Sergio.


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First United Bank of Lubbock Wins Statewide Award; updates on Parkhill https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/first-united-bank-of-lubbock-wins-statewide-award-updates-on-parkhill/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/first-united-bank-of-lubbock-wins-statewide-award-updates-on-parkhill/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 05:03:43 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/first-united-bank-of-lubbock-wins-statewide-award-updates-on-parkhill/ Parkhill announced new licensees. Ember Gonzalez de Lubbock received his license as a registered architect. In Parkhill’s K-12 sector, it uses Building Information Models (BIM) to coordinate design disciplines, reducing interference between building systems. As an experienced BIM user, Gonzalez often helps his less experienced peers use the software to its fullest potential. He also […]]]>

Parkhill announced new licensees.

Ember Gonzalez de Lubbock received his license as a registered architect. In Parkhill’s K-12 sector, it uses Building Information Models (BIM) to coordinate design disciplines, reducing interference between building systems. As an experienced BIM user, Gonzalez often helps his less experienced peers use the software to its fullest potential. He also designs for a range of project types including educational, religious, financial, multi-family residential and office facilities.

His plans include a new high school for Lubbock-Cooper ISD, a renovation and addition for a LISD college, an indoor athletics project for Melissa ISD and the LISD Southern Primary School. He received a Bachelor of Science in Architecture in 2005 from Texas Tech University, where he also obtained a Masters of Architecture in 2007.

Sandra Gutierrez of El Paso recently graduated as a Professional Engineer in Texas. She graduated from the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), where she obtained both a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering and a Master of Science in Civil Engineering.

Gutierrez

She designed horizontal and vertical pavement alignments, pavement geometry, intersections, multi-use hiking and biking trails, sidewalks and ramps suitable for pedestrians and ADA compliant, rehabilitation and widening high-speed facilities, Super 2 freeways and developed pavement markings and signage plans for customers in Texas and New Mexico. As a member of the Parkhill Transportation Sector team, her goal is to help customers balance their needs while implementing design guidelines, assessing the pros and cons of the design impacts of routes and managing team coordination internally and externally.


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Region faces $ 100 million loss if convention center is further delayed, tourist office says | Local company https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/region-faces-100-million-loss-if-convention-center-is-further-delayed-tourist-office-says-local-company/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/region-faces-100-million-loss-if-convention-center-is-further-delayed-tourist-office-says-local-company/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 22:15:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/region-faces-100-million-loss-if-convention-center-is-further-delayed-tourist-office-says-local-company/ The America’s Center is located between the Dome and the C-9 parking lot which is being demolished by construction crews on Friday October 8, 2021 in St. Louis. Photo by Daniel Shular, dshular@post-dispatch.com The America’s Center convention center is seen on Tuesday, September 28, 2021. After the tourism industry was hit hard by the pandemic, […]]]>

ST. LOUIS – The tourism board responsible for the America’s Center stalled expansion warns officials in St. Louis and St. Louis County that the regional economy could lose more than $ 100 million if the delays, caused by the political impasse, do not end.

Losses would hit that mark in six months, Kitty Ratcliffe, chair of the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, said in an email obtained by the Post-Dispatch.

“These numbers represent the bare minimum and a definite loss to the region’s businesses, the workforce of those businesses and the overall health of the region’s and state’s economy,” Ratcliffe wrote. She said she had not counted the cost of losing other groups waiting to book conventions until the project was underway.

First launched at the end of 2018, plans for the $ 210 million expansion call for a new ballroom and pavilion and 92,000 square feet of new exhibition space. The project is slated for completion in 2023. But internal political struggles and the pandemic have long delayed work that Ratcliffe and other officials say is critical to keeping the region competitive for congress traffic.

St. Louis officials fought in 2019 for control of the city’s bond issuance to fund the work, before delaying approval for months due to the coronavirus pandemic. Next, prominent developer Bob Clark, founder of design-build firm Clayco, pitched his own proposal for a new convention center to civic and business leaders, calling the existing plan “the smallest addition to the convention center already.” poorly designed ”.


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With the mass murders of Christians and the persecution of other religious minorities, should Nigeria be re-designated a country of particular concern? https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/with-the-mass-murders-of-christians-and-the-persecution-of-other-religious-minorities-should-nigeria-be-re-designated-a-country-of-particular-concern/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/with-the-mass-murders-of-christians-and-the-persecution-of-other-religious-minorities-should-nigeria-be-re-designated-a-country-of-particular-concern/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:33:56 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/with-the-mass-murders-of-christians-and-the-persecution-of-other-religious-minorities-should-nigeria-be-re-designated-a-country-of-particular-concern/ In the last six decades since gaining independence of Britain, Nigeria – Africa’s most populous country – faced one crisis after another that threatened to undermine its business existence. While the country has managed to survive the threats each time, the current security challenges plaguing the country, with ethnic and religious dimensions, could be the […]]]>

In the last six decades since gaining independence of Britain, Nigeria – Africa’s most populous country – faced one crisis after another that threatened to undermine its business existence. While the country has managed to survive the threats each time, the current security challenges plaguing the country, with ethnic and religious dimensions, could be the downfall of the nation, some fear.

The fear is not misplaced, given the daily or weekly media reports on the situation and the failure of security agents to stem attacks by bandits and terrorists in the country.

Dozens of deaths

On Sunday September 26, more than 30 people are said to have lost their lives when people described as “Fulani shepherds” invaded the Madamai and Abun communities, two predominantly Christian villages in the local government area of ​​Kaura, in the state of Kaduna, in northern Nigeria.

Previously, 12 people were killed in an attack on the village of Peigyim, near Kibori, in the Atyap chiefdom of the Zangon-Kataf local government area of ​​the same Kaduna state, by suspected Fulani militants.

The day before, in the same locality, Silas Yakubu Ali, a pastor, was allegedly attacked and killed by people yet to be apprehended.

These are just a few examples of security breaches in the country in recent weeks.

Group alleges 4,400 Christians were murdered

According to InterSociety, a non-governmental organization involved in human rights issues in Nigeria, “Nigerian Muslim jihadists, comprising state actors and radical Islamist non-state actors, have had during the last nine months of 2021, from January to September, a period of 270 days. , stabbed as many as 4,400 helpless and unprotected Christians (along with) 20 Christian clergy (also) killed or kidnapped.

“Nigerian Muslim jihadists… in the last nine months of 2021 or January to September, a period of 270 days, have killed as many as 4,400 defenseless and unprotected Christians.

He adds that during the “indomitable genocidal anti-Christian assassinations and violence against property, the number of sacred places of worship and learning … severely attacked by jihadists since January 2021 has increased to between 350 and 400”, and that “as many as 3,500 of the travelers and sedentary Christians have also been abducted in the past nine months of 2021; several dozen fear being killed in captivity. In total, an average of 490 Christians have been killed in each of the past nine months and 16 in each of the past 270 days.

Other targeted religious minorities

However, it is not only Christians who have borne the brunt of the terrorist and bandit attacks in Nigeria. Muslims and mosques have also been the target of the terrorist group Boko Haram since 2009. While carrying out sustained attacks against Christian targets over the years, Boko Haram – which has an avowed hatred for Western education and seeks to create a caliphate in the country – also targets Muslims who do not share its violent ideology, or young students from the predominantly Muslim northern region seeking to brighten their future through education.

A 2016 article by Alex Thurston, commissioned by the Brookings Institution, states that “most of the victims of Boko Haram were Muslims. Shekau (the former leader of the group, now believed to be deceased) claimed to imitate the Prophet by slaughtering “unbelievers” in communities in the northeast.

“Very worrying trends”

In assessing Nigeria’s precarious security situation, a major concern of some observers is that the country’s leadership led by Muhammadu Buhari, who took power in 2015, has not been able to stop the attacks, suppress or to effectively prosecute the culprits. And that failure not only led Nigeria to be declared a Country of Special Concern by the US State Department in December of last year, but has also increasingly led Christians and religious groups to call on the government to not. not have brought the culprits to justice.

With the intensification of attacks since last year and the inability of the security forces to bring the situation under control, Frederick A. Davie, commissioner at the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, said Nigeria deserved to be re-designated. country of particular concern to the US state. Department.

While congratulating Nigerians on their country’s independence anniversary on October 1, Davie told BNG that USCIRF has observed “very disturbing trends in Nigeria” on issues of freedom or interreligious belief.

“We are particularly concerned about the attacks against vulnerable religious communities, in particular minority religious communities. “

“For example, we are particularly concerned about attacks on vulnerable religious communities, especially minority religious communities, without any apparently robust response from the government to hold those who commit these violent attacks to account,” he said. . “So we are concerned at USCIRF about the attacks on religious communities that occur with impunity when the government does not treat them sufficiently. “

As examples of violence with impunity in the country, Davie mentioned the recent murder of a Christian minister, Yohanna Shuaibu, in Kano, northern Nigeria, by a violent mob for his alleged involvement in the conversion of a member local of a Muslim family to Christianity; the attack on two Christian communities which led to the death and destruction of the land; the murder of eight Shia Muslims by Nigerian security forces; the targeting and kidnapping of Christian and Muslim students by terrorists and bandits; violent attacks on sacred religious celebrations and gatherings during Ramadan this spring (by suspected terrorists) as well as two Christian congregations on Christmas Eve.

Frédéric A. Davie

Other areas of concern for the USCIRF, Davie said, are the arrest of Mubarak Bala, head of the Nigeria Humanist Association, who has been accused of causing public discontent by posting material considered to be blasphemous, and the detention of 22-year-old Yahaya Sharif Aminu. musician, accused of insulting the Prophet Muhammad in a private message on social networks. Bala and Aminu were both adopted by Davie as religious prisoners of conscience as part of the USCIRF’s religious prisoners of conscience program.

Other areas of concern for the USCIRF in Nigeria, according to Commissioner Davie, are the treatment of Sheikh AbdulJabbar Nasiru Kabara, who has been accused of blasphemy and incitement by authorities in Kano State, the arrest of some people accused of engaging in LGBTQ activities deemed by the Council of Hisbah in Kano State to be against the law of nature, as well as another state policy requiring poets and the singers submit their documents to a censorship committee for approval.

“These are some of the violations of religious freedom that are observed and documented to have taken place in the country, and the government has done little to address these violations of religious freedom and, in addition, many cases, has supported violations of religious freedoms by his own actions, ”Davie said.

A double standard?

He wondered why the Buhari administration was unable to subdue criminals and terrorists while successfully tracking down and apprehending the main leaders of a separatist group in the southeast of the country led by Nnamdi Kanu. , who was arrested outside Nigeria in late June.

“The perpetrators of these attacks operate with impunity and the authorities fail to investigate and hold them to account. “

“What our investigators, our research and our conversations with our colleagues in Nigeria tell us is that often the perpetrators of these attacks operate with impunity and that the authorities do not investigate them and do not compel them to report. accounts. Nigerian authorities say the country lacks the capacity to do more than it is currently doing to hold perpetrators accountable for religious violence. We believe in USCIRF, this argument is selective at best based on Nigeria’s vigorous response to Shia Muslims, to the growing violence of Biafran separatists in the southeast of the country.

“If the Nigerian government can launch a swift campaign against political dissidents in the southeast in a matter of months, why has it not mobilized the same resources to tackle sectarian violence and violations of religious freedom in the country ? He asked.

The clamor for Nigeria to be reclassified as a country of particular concern, he said, is justified because the country “has engaged in systemic, continuing and egregious violations of religious freedom of belief.”

And that could have an effect on US foreign policy and sanctions, he added.

Anthony Akaeze is a Nigerian-born freelance journalist currently living in Houston. It covers Africa for BNG.

Related Articles:

Boko Haram still rages in Nigeria claiming to do God’s work

US agency calls for more religious freedom in Nigeria


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church or state on Catholic cemeteries? https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/church-or-state-on-catholic-cemeteries/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/church-or-state-on-catholic-cemeteries/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 22:17:24 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/church-or-state-on-catholic-cemeteries/ New South Wales Prime Minister Dominic Perrottet is set to rename himself as a man of the center, but there remains the unexplained – and as yet unresolved – saga of how he, as State Treasurer, dealt with requests from the Catholic Church. The problem is Sydney’s cemeteries and who controls their management. It’s also […]]]>

New South Wales Prime Minister Dominic Perrottet is set to rename himself as a man of the center, but there remains the unexplained – and as yet unresolved – saga of how he, as State Treasurer, dealt with requests from the Catholic Church.

The problem is Sydney’s cemeteries and who controls their management. It’s also a story of power, influence, and how the church fights for its interests.

The highlight of the story is the claim that Perrottet, as treasurer, argued for the proposals supported by the Catholic Archdiocese of Sydney – despite an assessment by senior officials from two separate departments as the The church’s business case was not up to par.

Why is this important?

A year ago, a statutory review carried out by independent consultants did not doubt that the only way to solve the serious problems of Sydney’s cemeteries was to centralize management under a government agency called OneCrown.

For the Catholic Church, the plan meant ceding control of much of Sydney’s cemeteries to the government of New South Wales. He opposes this as secularizing death and campaigned to prevent it from happening. The church and its organization, the Council of Catholic Cemeteries (CCB), have developed counter-proposals.

There is a parallel claim that Perottet and other members of the government may have come close to breaking the ICAC’s rules on direct transactions – rules that dictate how the government must deal with a potential service provider to avoid the corruption.

Besides Perrottet, his friends in the government would be the Minister of Finance Damien Tudehope. Tudehope began his political career on the conservative right of politics as a spokesperson for the Australian Family Association, an offshoot of BA Santamaria’s National Civic Council (NCC).

Tudehope was also NSW chairman of the NCC before he found a home in the Liberal Party at his conservative religious base in the north-western suburb of Sydney. Perrottet, as Australia is beginning to learn, has a traditional conservative religious approach to issues such as abortion, voluntary assistance in dying, and same-sex marriage.

In response to Crikey’s questions, Tudehope said: “Any input or discussion I have had with my colleagues on this has nothing to do with my faith and everything to do with getting the best outcome for the people of NSW – something that every member of this government works towards every day.

There is a process to follow and I have no doubts that we will achieve an outcome that is in the best interests of families and communities in NSW. ”

But is the church’s plan in NSW’s best interest?

Not according to NSW government bureaucrats.

Investment NSW concluded that it would cost “much more” than the management of cemeteries by a single state authority. This made it “difficult to demonstrate value for money.”

Investment NSW officials also concluded that adopting the church model may be a direct relationship with the Catholic Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust, a church-related organization that operates four cemeteries in Sydney – in part because there was “no evidence” that the CCB was the only party capable of meeting the needs of the functioning of the Sydney cemeteries. In fact, Catholic organizations “may be unable to meet the needs of other faith groups.”

Despite this, the New South Wales Treasury, headed by Perrottet, continued to promote the church’s proposal. A document from the Treasury supporting it was submitted to the cabinet at the end of September. A senior official noted that the bid came in the short term and had no input from other government departments. The manager also noted that the proposal did not meet any criteria defined by independent consultants.

Crykey asked Perrottet for comments but received no response.

Lebanese Muslim Association concerned

Last month, the Lebanese Muslim Association (LMA) sent a legal letter to the government threatening to take action on the “uncompetitive, unapproved and unsolicited” proposals that the Catholic Church had presented to several ministers and government agencies in an attempt to persuade them to abandon the idea of ​​an independent state-run body.

Muslims are one of many faith groups concerned about the dwindling supply of cemeteries in Sydney.

The LMA asserted that the government’s “exclusive and repeated transactions” with the Catholic Archdiocese violated the ICAC’s rules on direct transactions, and that the ICAC should be made aware. He also reported on a series of meetings between the government and representatives of Catholic organizations that had taken place before, during and after the official overhaul of cemeteries.

It all started in July 2017 with a meeting with Perrottet when he was treasurer and minister of industrial relations. Between August and September 2017, there were further meetings between members of the Catholic-led consortium and officials from the Treasury and Perrottet office.

Since 2018, there have been several meetings with other ministers as the Catholic Church defended its cause. In June of this year, the church met with the then Prime Minister, Gladys Berejiklian. Two days later, then Deputy Prime Minister John Barilaro intervened with a plan that appeased the anger of the church, ensuring that it “would continue to manage and operate cemeteries in Sydney”.

This “peace deal” was accompanied by a new proposal from the church in Barilaro requiring two consecutive 99-year leases for the cemetery land, the transfer of nearly $ 140 million in lifelong care funds to a company. Catholic and a 100-year exclusive operator agreement.

The government-commissioned independent report – the 11th Hour Report – showed that the government-owned trust, currently managed by the Catholic Cemeteries Board, would generate a cash surplus of approximately $ 1.2 billion over the 25 next few years, and over $ 5 billion in 50 years.

Links at the top

There has been both an open door and a revolving door between the NSW government and the organizations that run Sydney’s cemeteries.

Tudehope is a former governor of the CWB and a member of its board of directors. He resigned in 2015, a month before entering Parliament in NSW – in a seat vacated by former NSW Attorney General Greg Smith, who was later appointed chairman of the CBB. To complete the Trinity of Movements, Perrottet moved to Epping’s headquarters from Tudehope when Tudehope became a member of the upper chamber of NSW.

The Catholic Archbishop of Sydney, Anthony Fisher, has also been at the forefront of government – and has made his voice heard in the pages of the australian as well as on Sky News, where he appeared in office dresses and championing the cause of the church (and earning a sympathetic ear from Peta Credlin).

The campaign intensifies

It is a measure of the stake that the Archdiocese of Sydney has shifted into full-fledged campaign mode for the government to drop the recommendations of the independent review.

Former Liberal Minister Michael Photios – now one of Australia’s most powerful lobbyists – has been recruited, along with veteran public relations Tim Allerton, one of Sydney’s best-connected operators.

The campaign also obtained legal advice from at least one authority Geoffrey Watson SC – the lawyer assisting the ICAC in a 2011 Liberal campaign finance investigation – that there is no case of “direct operation” to be carried out in the conduct of Catholic organizations.

Watson is a member of the board of directors of the Center for Public Integrity and an assistant professor at the Catholic higher education institution of the University of Notre Dame. He declined to comment on whether or not he had a conflict of interest, citing client confidentiality.

The Archdiocese has threatened to campaign in seats of state where there is a high proportion of Catholics, and also sacked the New South Wales Minister of Water, Property and Housing, Melinda Pavey, who is directly responsible for the cemeteries.

Pell’s man enters the frame

In a media statement, the church pulled out one of its biggest guns, Danny Casey, to unload on Pavey. Casey is Director of the CCB, alongside former New South Wales Attorney General Greg Smith. Specifically, Casey is also the former consigliere of Cardinal George Pell and spent time with Pell in the Vatican before returning to Australia.

Casey said the board was “shocked” that Pavey and his “faceless bureaucrats” alongside a “fringe religious association” attempt to “undermine” a pledge made by Barilaro to retire via “spurious allegations” “. (This “fringe organization,” the LMA, is a non-profit organization which it claims is responsible for about 80% of Islamic funerals.)

“It is not surprising that Minister Pavey is seeking to merge the Catholic Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust with OneCrown, which, after many years of mismanagement, faces a deficit of $ 160 million while the CMCT has about the same amount of surplus, lifelong care funds to ensure many faith groups can bury their dead, ”Casey said.

The message is clear from above: don’t mess with the Catholic Church.

Pavey was a possible candidate to take the leadership of Barilaro’s National Party. She did not succeed. Perrottet could also reshuffle cabinet posts – good luck. Crykey left no doubt that Pavey won’t do well if the church has anything to do with it.

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Editor-in-chief of Crykey

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Possible upcoming revisions to the vaccination mandate for Colorado healthcare workers https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/possible-upcoming-revisions-to-the-vaccination-mandate-for-colorado-healthcare-workers/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/possible-upcoming-revisions-to-the-vaccination-mandate-for-colorado-healthcare-workers/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:16:07 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/possible-upcoming-revisions-to-the-vaccination-mandate-for-colorado-healthcare-workers/ COLORADO – Healthcare workers are now being sacked for failing to meet the state’s immunization mandate. Of the 26,500 UCHealth employees statewide, 119 employees, or less than 0.5% of our workforce, have not received any of the three available COVID-19 vaccines or have not received a medical exemption or religious. The employment of these 119 […]]]>

COLORADO – Healthcare workers are now being sacked for failing to meet the state’s immunization mandate.

Of the 26,500 UCHealth employees statewide, 119 employees, or less than 0.5% of our workforce, have not received any of the three available COVID-19 vaccines or have not received a medical exemption or religious. The employment of these 119 employees is terminated. This includes 32 employees in the southern Colorado area. Some who work in other health establishments fear they will be next.

Colorado Hospital Association said there could be a review of the emergency decision this month to allow medical and religious exemptions or for those who hire people who are not yet fully vaccinated. Many health systems wait until the end of October to make their final decisions. There are different calendars at work with the mandate of the state as well as the mandates of the health system of each individual.

“We have seen some drafts of some revisions that CDPHE could recommend to the board to consider for the emergency rule and which would include lowering the facility compliance rate from 100% to 90%, which would be consistent with our other vaccine mandate as with our influenza vaccine, ”said Cara Welch, senior communications director for the Colorado Hospital Association.

A recent study said one in five healthcare workers left the medical field during the pandemic due to stress and burnout. Healthcare facilities are also seeing workers move to other areas where they might be better paid or where they are needed more.

“Right now, staffing is our number one concern,” Welch said. “I would say the tenure is really just one part of what we’re dealing with with our staffing. “

The Colorado Hospital Association represents almost all of the state’s health systems, including more than 100 hospitals and health systems. They said the state board of health is meeting on October 21 to consider some revisions to the vaccines mandate.

“So there are a lot of uncertainties right now and some are related and we have revisions coming later in October,” Welch added.

Parkview Medical Center in Pueblo has said that due to staff shortages, bed capacity and an increase in COVID-19 cases, some non-life-threatening surgeries will be delayed. The Parkview Medical Center has said that with increasing hospitalizations from COVID-19 and staff shortages in various departments, the health system must use resources where they are needed most. They began to slow down elective procedures requiring a hospital bed and monitor them on a case-by-case basis.

“Our hospital bed capacity is very limited at the moment. We are proactive and careful with elective procedures as we work diligently every day to care for our community. Along with the increase in the number of COVID-19 patients, we have also seen a great need for other services. Our hope is that all service lines remain open and fully functional, but we will only do so if patient care can be delivered safely and are staffed appropriately, said Leslie Barnes, President and Chief Executive Officer. the management of Parkview Health System.

As of Monday, 20% of their staff had not been vaccinated. The mandate to vaccinate Parkview employees and partners is effective November 1, 2021.

“We always urge the Coloradans to seek care when they need it, part of what we see in our hospitals are people who may have delayed care or postponed preventative care during the pandemic and now they are coming. in a very acute condition, ”Welch said.

The Colorado Hospital Association encourages everyone to get vaccinated in safe communities. There are many health systems that have not made a decision and are waiting until the end of October to do so.

Centura Health, in accordance with state immunization policy, submitted its immunization and exemption data on Friday, October 1, 2021. We will continue to work across our connected ecosystem to ensure we meet additional deadlines. set by the state.

Centura health declaration

The state is required to publish the data of each health system and the immunization status of their staff online, this information has not yet been published but should be in a few days.

UCHealth’s top priority is the safety of our patients, visitors and everyone who works in our facilities. To increase safety and minimize the spread of COVID-19, all staff and providers must now be vaccinated or receive an approved medical or religious exemption.

Anyone leaving UCHealth’s job is welcome – and encouraged – to reapply for their position if they decide to get a COVID-19 vaccine and wish to return.

Despite the loss of these employees, UCHealth’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement has helped improve staff. With high vaccination rates, fewer employees test positive for COVID-19 and have to stop work while they recover.

No hospital wants to lose valuable employees, but we know that vaccines save lives and increase safety for everyone. We value our staff and providers who have chosen to be vaccinated to protect their families, colleagues and patients. Our dedicated healthcare workers are improving the health of Colorado communities during what has been an extremely difficult time for everyone in healthcare.

To ensure we have the safest possible environment for our patients, visitors and healthcare workers, any employee who has received an approved vaccine exemption will need to be tested for COVID-19 twice a week, starting. the week of October 3. testing is a condition of employment, and employees are responsible for scheduling them. UCHealth will cover the cost of the tests.

Dan Weaver, Vice President of Communications at UCHealth


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How to mix strength with weakness https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/how-to-mix-strength-with-weakness/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/how-to-mix-strength-with-weakness/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 05:10:15 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/how-to-mix-strength-with-weakness/ Measuring the power of a religious leader is never easy. In 1935, when the French Foreign Minister urged Stalin to make concessions to the Catholics in Russia, he received the mocking response: “How many [military] divisions has the Pope? The Soviet leader never imagined that half a century later, the moral influence of a Polish […]]]>

Measuring the power of a religious leader is never easy. In 1935, when the French Foreign Minister urged Stalin to make concessions to the Catholics in Russia, he received the mocking response: “How many [military] divisions has the Pope? The Soviet leader never imagined that half a century later, the moral influence of a Polish pontiff would help end Moscow’s rule over Eastern Europe.

When Joe Biden speaks with the Ecumenical Patriarch later this month, the world’s strongest earth leader will be faced with a spiritual figure who exhibits a unique combination of helplessness and moral authority. When White House staff prepare a briefing for the president, it will be difficult to describe, in just a few words, why this visitor is so important. It is an elusive question.

His All Holiness has, of course, no military division. For a world-class spiritual guide, he lives in a modest wooden building near the Golden Horn and presides over services, in all their intricate beauty, where the local congregation is small if not nonexistent.

His very survival in his hometown has always been precarious. Indeed, over the past century, the continued existence of his former office – one of the oldest institutions of any kind in the world – has been a sort of diplomatic and political miracle.

And yet his personal position – as an advocate for interfaith understanding and an advocate for the natural environment, among other causes – has been widely recognized, both inside and outside the world of religion. Neither Time magazine nor the British Guardian newspaper are known for their interest in obscure theological issues, but both have recognized Patriarch Vartholomaios as one of the most influential figures in the world.

It is also worth recalling how the miracle of the survival of the Patriarchate in Istanbul unfolded, because its consequences remain palpable.

In December 1922, as Greek and Turkish peace negotiators set to work in Lausanne, the victors were adamant that the Patriarchate, tainted with association with the Greek war effort, had to leave its hometown. Greece and Great Britain resisted strongly. Lord Curzon, the British Foreign Secretary who chaired the conference, said the conscience of the whole world would be offended if this former religious office was removed from its historic seat. In this he was strongly supported by the Anglican Church, which perhaps saw the Patriarchate as a counterweight to the Vatican’s influence on Christians in the East.

In the first week of January 1923 a cautious compromise was reached. Ismet Pasha said that as a supreme act of goodwill, his country would allow the Patriarchate to remain – but only if it was limited to purely spiritual activities and renounced the administrative role (which had included considerable influence over the life of the Orthodox Christians of the empire) which he had exercised during the Ottoman era. Riza Nur, who had the sharpest tongue among Turkish delegates, bitterly concluded that letting the Patriarchate stay could be a way to ‘keep the snake in its hole’.

At least in spirit, the market on the Patriarchate helped pave the way for a broader Greco-Turkish pact under which every country formally traded religious minorities, with the carefully defined exception of the Ottoman Muslims of Western Thrace. and the Greeks established in Istanbul as of 1918. This agreement, in turn, became part of the Lausanne Peace Treaty, which included promises to respect the educational and cultural rights of religious minorities on both sides of the sea Aegean.

But as soon as this became clear, the exceptions to the population exchange were more politically controversial than the population exchange itself. The exchange had devastating consequences for hundreds of thousands of ordinary citizens, but its implementation did little to disrupt the diplomatic atmosphere between Athens and Ankara. The fate of those who remained – including the Patriarch – was another matter.

In less than two years, Greco-Turkish tensions over the Patriarchate were at their boiling point. In December 1924, a patriarch was elected who, from a Turkish point of view, was not considered an “established” resident of the city and was therefore subject to forced eviction by virtue of the population exchange.

The following month, Patriarch Constantine was arrested and sent to Greece, where he was greeted by angry crowds and demands for an immediate break in relations. A new war with Turkey seemed possible. Kathimerini’s headlines on January 31, 1925 reflect strong emotions: “The Ecumenical Patriarchate has been overthrown. The Turks arrested and expelled Patriarch Constantine. It is impossible to maintain diplomatic relations.

Greece is preparing to raise the issue with the League of Nations, guardian of the Lausanne regulations and their implementation. Turkey angrily retorted that the Patriarchate’s presence was not part of the Lausanne agreement, but an entirely domestic matter, stemming from a unilateral gesture of goodwill.

In the end, the two governments backed down from confrontation. A new patriarch was elected whose legal right to stay in Turkey was not in question. But a deep disagreement over the status of the Patriarchate had been revealed and remains unresolved to this day.

From the Turkish point of view, the Patriarchate was a domestic institution, responsible only for the local Greek community. A decree of December 1923 stipulated that candidates for the Patriarchate must be Greek Orthodox clerics of Turkish nationality.

For Greece, the old office is a matter of vivid and legitimate concern in bilateral talks with Turkey, not least because so many Greek citizens are passionate about its survival. The welfare of the Patriarchate is also, in the eyes of the Greeks, an international issue, given the “primacy of honor” (“proteio”) that the See of Constantinople holds in the Orthodox world at large. The precise consequences of this primacy are hotly contested, but the primacy itself is not in question.

(Indeed, the international status enjoyed by the Patriarchate can sometimes be a headache, as well as a source of pride and prestige, for Greece. Precisely because the Patriarchate has an international role – sometimes purely symbolic, sometimes very actions and statements may not always precisely coincide with Greece’s national policies.

This dilemma has existed since the end of the 19th century. When the great ecclesiastical statesman Patriarch Ioakeim III took office, politicians in Athens expected him to take the toughest position possible in the burgeoning ecclesiastical dispute with the Bulgarians. Much to their disappointment, the Patriarch took a more conciliatory line, taking into account the broader interests of Orthodoxy. But subsequent generations of Greek historians have long forgiven him.)

During the lifetime of Vartholomaios I, who began on the island of Imbros in 1940, the fate of the Patriarchate reflected all the murderous turmoil in the region and around the world. The office of Patriarch Athenagoras (1948–1972) began in a euphoric atmosphere of friendship between the United States, Greece and Turkey, but was marked by a series of devastating events that almost ended the existence of his local herd: the anti-Greek riots of September 1955, the expulsions of 1964 and the closure of the Halki seminary in 1971. Patriarch Dimitrios (1972-91) worked quietly and assiduously in the field of religious diplomacy but its activities have been severely circumscribed by the Turkish authorities.

When Vartholomaios I was enthroned in November 1991, he was very cautious about the prospects of the Patriarchate. In one of his earliest statements he used the New Testament quote “My strength is made perfect in weakness.”

In objective terms, the worldly weakness and vulnerability of the Patriarch remains more palpable than ever. And yet, President Biden wouldn’t meet His Holiness if he wasn’t, in a more intangible sense, very strong.


Bruce Clark writes for The Economist on history, culture and religion.


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Faith groups come to the aid of Haitian migrants and denounce mistreatment | Religion https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/faith-groups-come-to-the-aid-of-haitian-migrants-and-denounce-mistreatment-religion/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/faith-groups-come-to-the-aid-of-haitian-migrants-and-denounce-mistreatment-religion/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/faith-groups-come-to-the-aid-of-haitian-migrants-and-denounce-mistreatment-religion/ Faith groups – many of whom have long advocated for a more welcoming immigration policy – have struggled to keep up with the rapidly evolving Haitian migrant crisis, trying to help those in need while attacking the harsh tactics of border patrol employed against them. Before thousands of Haitian migrants dispersed last week from a […]]]>

Faith groups – many of whom have long advocated for a more welcoming immigration policy – have struggled to keep up with the rapidly evolving Haitian migrant crisis, trying to help those in need while attacking the harsh tactics of border patrol employed against them.

Before thousands of Haitian migrants dispersed last week from a camp in the border town of Del Rio, Texas, a coalition of churches and other groups were providing them with sandwiches, water and more. essential products. Since their dispersal, many migrants have received help from faith groups in Houston and El Paso as they seek to connect with relatives and sponsors across the United States.

Immigration extremists criticize some of the efforts of religious activists, saying their efforts encourage even more migrants to come. But those who provide aid see it as an extension of their religious mandate to help the needy.

“We are apolitical,” said Carlos Villareal, a Houston-area leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who has mobilized volunteers at a short-term transition center in Houston to help out. hundreds of migrants arriving from Del Rio.

“Our concern is mainly with the families, that we can help them,” Villareal said. “It’s also the golden rule: do to others what you would have done for yourself. “

The transition center was set up earlier this year at the request of the White House in response to earlier migrant influxes, Villareal said. It offers families a place to shower, have a meal, and contact sponsors who would pay for their plane or bus tickets to join them while their cases go through the immigration process.

Most Haitian migrants are expected to apply to immigration judges for asylum or other legal status – requests that could be denied and lead to possible deportation.

Villareal says he meets migrants with similar stories to his parents, who immigrated from Mexico in search of a better life, so as not to be a burden on society.

“These people are just here looking for an opportunity,” he said.

Mobilization of faith-based groups began almost as soon as the sudden influx of migrants began in Del Rio, with Haitians converging from various Latin American countries to which they had fled their besieged Caribbean homeland.

Volunteers from a coalition of Christian churches and other groups in this region along the US-Mexico border have prepared more than 10,000 sandwiches for Haitian migrants camping under the bridge that connects Del Rio to Ciudad Acuña in Mexico said Shon Young, president of the Val Verde border. Humanitarian coalition.

Their work started with around 20 churches and has spread to more than 100 churches and other organizations, said Young, who is an associate pastor at City Church Del Rio.

Her church also raised donations and the coalition set up an Amazon wishlist that included juices, hand sanitizer and snacks. The response – from American and Haitian organizations and distant individual donors – has been overwhelming, Young said.

The camp numbered over 14,000 people at its peak. Many Haitian migrants are deported and flown back to Haiti, but many others who gathered in Del Rio have been released in the United States, according to two US officials.

The Department of Homeland Security transported Haitians from Del Rio to El Paso, Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley along the Texas border, and added flights to Tucson, Ariz., Said one of the responsible. They are handled by the border patrol at these locations.

The El Paso Baptist Association offers migrants COVID-19 testing and provides them with food, clothing and a place to sleep while they contact family members or other sponsors. Since the end of July, the association has helped more than 300 migrants, mostly Haitians, and expected many more to arrive from Del Rio, said Larry Floyd, the group’s executive director.

Catholic-led nonprofits and other faith-based organizations have long been at the forefront of efforts to support migrants and asylum seekers along the Mexican border, providing essential services to two sides of the Rio Grande.

Pope Francis praised the work of Sister Norma Pimentel, Executive Director of Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley. Other well-known groups include the Jewish Family Service in San Diego, which provides housing and other assistance to migrants, and Annunciation House in El Paso, which provides shelter for migrants while they plan their trip to other American cities.

Annunciation House, which says its mission is based on Catholic education in social justice, has prepared to receive several hundred migrants from Del Rio, executive director Ruben Garcia said.

“First they are tested,” Garcia said. “Once they’re tested for COVID, we start welcoming them. “

At times, faith groups have embarked on a polarizing national debate over immigration policies. Although many praise their work to help migrants, some critics say it encourages more people to come to the United States

“A lot of these religious groups are confusing two issues … It’s different to advocate for government policy that would import more people like this,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies. The center favors more restrictive immigration policies.

Many religious leaders joined an appeal last week organized by the national nonprofit Faith in Action network urging the administration of President Joe Biden to stop deporting migrants to Haiti without giving them the opportunity to seek asylum. in the United States and to protest their treatment after the broadcast of images of the border patrol. agents on horseback using aggressive tactics.

“This is unacceptable and cannot be tolerated today,” said Reverend Alvin Herring, executive director of Faith in Action.

The Catholic Social Justice Network lobby called for increased surveillance of US customs and border protection. The network’s director of government relations, Ronnate Asirwatham, said CBP had “a history of systemic abuse and racism.”

The group joined more than 160 Catholic organizations in a letter asking Biden to end the authority of Title 42, named after a section of a 1944 public health law that the then president, Donald Trump, used in March 2020 to effectively end asylum at the Mexican border.

Herring, who traveled to Del Rio with other religious leaders to assess the situation firsthand, said pushing for the Biden administration to honor its commitments to the migrants was essential.

“We see our Haitian brothers and sisters the finger for this despicable abuse, which we believe to be racist and immoral,” he said.


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‘It Hurts’: Legacy Health Nurse Denies Request for Religious Exemption from COVID-19 Vaccine | Local News https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/it-hurts-legacy-health-nurse-denies-request-for-religious-exemption-from-covid-19-vaccine-local-news/ https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/it-hurts-legacy-health-nurse-denies-request-for-religious-exemption-from-covid-19-vaccine-local-news/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 13:03:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/it-hurts-legacy-health-nurse-denies-request-for-religious-exemption-from-covid-19-vaccine-local-news/ PORTLAND, Ore. (KPTV) – The deadline for Legacy Health staff to be vaccinated against COVID-19 is Thursday, and some nurses who relied on a religious or medical exemption are finding that request has been denied. PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) – Legacy Health announced Wednesday that they are requiring all of their employees, suppliers, on-site contractors and […]]]>

PORTLAND, Ore. (KPTV) – The deadline for Legacy Health staff to be vaccinated against COVID-19 is Thursday, and some nurses who relied on a religious or medical exemption are finding that request has been denied.

PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) – Legacy Health announced Wednesday that they are requiring all of their employees, suppliers, on-site contractors and volunteers…

An email dated September 27 informed Hildi Espino that her request for a religious exception to Legacy Health’s vaccine requirement had been denied.

“Looking at this letter, of course, I was appalled that I didn’t get approved,” Espino told FOX 12.

A registered nurse, Espino says she has been with Legacy since 2015. She says she thinks taking the COVID-19 vaccine is against her religious conscience.

“I believed I had used the scriptures and created an argument that was understandable, genuine, and would be judged by my religious beliefs, and I had faith in the system,” she said.

Espino is not there and sees his request for exception refused. According to the Oregon Nurse’s Association, other Legacy nurses are reporting what they call “general vaccine exemption rejections,” with nurses at Legacy Silverton Hospital claiming that every religious exemption request in the labor department and hospital delivery was refused.

“It’s not right, what is expected of us and the huge losses we are suffering,” Espino said.

For its part, Legacy says it has completed a thorough review of all employee vaccine exception requests. In a statement, a spokesperson said, “Legacy’s number one priority is patient and employee safety. In anticipation of the potential impact on our staff, Legacy has developed a series of emergency plans at all of our facilities to minimize the impact on patient care.

More than 100 PeaceHealth workers and families protest against COVID-19 vaccine requirement

VANCOUVER, WA (KPTV) – Several local health systems now require caregivers to be immunized, including the PeaceHealth hospital system.

Espino, meanwhile, says hospitals were already understaffed before the pandemic and the loss of more nurses now due to a vaccination warrant will only make matters worse.

“Making such an important decision as this as a healthcare facility will have a huge impact on patient care,” she said.

The Oregon Nurses Association said nurses concerned about a denied exemption request should file a complaint with the Bureau of Labor and Industries.

FOX 12 learned more about the process Legacy uses to assess vaccine exemption requests. Espino provided a letter that Legacy emailed him. The letter says that when reviewing applications, they remove the names from the documents and then send them to a working group for review.

The letter says the task force is using the following criteria: consistency or whether the employee has received any other vaccines recently and is looking to see if the religious belief is clearly stated and specifically against the COVID-19 vaccine.

Once a request is denied, the letter states that workers have three options:

  • Either keep their job by getting vaccinated
  • Take no action and be put on leave on October 1, then fired on October 19
  • Or resign in writing.

Copyright 2021 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.


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