Religious association – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 06:15:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T154232.929.png Religious association – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ 32 32 How to Avoid Election Violence-Sultan, CAN https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/how-to-avoid-election-violence-sultan-can/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 06:08:57 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/how-to-avoid-election-violence-sultan-can/ The Sultan of Sokoto and Chairman of the Nigerian Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs (NSCIA), Alhaji Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar III and the President of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Archbishop Daniel Okoh have suggested ways to to avoid violence in 2023 General Elections. They spoke on Monday in Abuja at the Inclusive Security Dialogue […]]]>

The Sultan of Sokoto and Chairman of the Nigerian Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs (NSCIA), Alhaji Muhammadu Sa’ad Abubakar III and the President of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Archbishop Daniel Okoh have suggested ways to to avoid violence in 2023 General Elections.

They spoke on Monday in Abuja at the Inclusive Security Dialogue (ISD) facilitated by the Global Peace Foundation (Nigeria), Vison Africa and ADF International.

They urged security agencies and other stakeholders to act collectively to prevent the consequences of the dangers of rigging, hate speech and other forms of election violence and malfeasance.

The Sultan of Sokoto, represented by Dr. Hussaini Zakariyya of the Sultan Foundation, urged religious leaders to use their platforms to discourage young people from participating in election violence.

As Buhari launches oil drilling in the North: residents of Bauchi and Gombe demand jobs and a clean environment

NIGERIA DAILY: Is oil in the North a blessing or a curse?

“Religious leaders are the most important and influential bloc in every society, especially in Nigeria, by their nature and space, very religious people.

“Every Muslim, every Christian is proud to be who he is and what he believes in. And not only that, he is ready to protect this life with everything he has, his possessions and everything he owns.

“Therefore, unless and until religious leaders are directly involved in the peacebuilding process to bring about the peaceful co-existence of Nigerians, there will be no peace. No one really has the power and influence like religious leaders,” the sultan said.

For his part, the President of the CAN, Msgr. Daniel Okoh, warned against electoral violence, saying that the consequences are likely to truncate the democratic process and the national development of the country.

He said the peace accord signed by the presidential candidates should not be a mere formality, but enforced.

“While tackling pre- and post-election violence in Nigeria is a Herculean task, well-meaning Nigerians and other development partners who want to distance themselves from the orgies of election violence and its aftermath must not be discouraged”.

“It is clear that the intention of the National Peace Committee is not only to accomplish all justice. The signing of the peace agreement must be diligently monitored by law enforcement to ensure compliance by all parties with serious consequences for breaching the agreement,” Okoh said.

He also urged state and federal governments to make genuine efforts to create employment opportunities for young people in abundance or provide entrepreneurship training and financing opportunities to their small businesses to prevent them. to deploy their youthful energy and in the destructive exercise of electoral violence. .

He also noted that the incidence of drug and substance abuse among young people is a catalyst for election violence, as those involved in drug abuse only know the consequences of their actions after the effect of the drugs subsided in them.

The CAN boss instructed the Independent National Electoral Commission to be impartial in its conduct before, during and after the elections.

“INEC should be seen as giving a level playing field to all candidates and their political parties. Allegations of poll workers colluding with party agents to frustrate voters on election day or tamper with election results are unlikely to resurface in future elections.

“Sometimes post-election violence is triggered by alleged unfairness and unfairness demonstrated by electorate officers. The 2023 election holds the key to our progress as a nation or our designation as a failed or failing state,” Okoh said.

Earlier, Vision Africa Chairman, Bishop Sunday Onuoha said peace and security in Nigeria is more important than the election campaign, warning that the country could be on the brink of historic change if pay no attention to it.

“If there is no peace, no one will come out to campaign or vote,” he said.

Global Peace Foundation President Jim Flynn noted that “the global world is interested in the success of the 2023 election, so everyone must contribute positively to the success of the election.”

]]>
Iranian regime fails to contain mass protests, despite heavy-handed tactics https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/iranian-regime-fails-to-contain-mass-protests-despite-heavy-handed-tactics/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 21:35:18 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/iranian-regime-fails-to-contain-mass-protests-despite-heavy-handed-tactics/ The Iranian regime is working to crush a massive wave of nimble and sustained protests unlike any the Islamic Republic has faced in the past. The leaderless movement has grown stronger despite increasingly harsh repressions, relying on unprecedented solidarity between ethnic minorities, different religious groups and the solidarity of men with women. The movement began […]]]>

The Iranian regime is working to crush a massive wave of nimble and sustained protests unlike any the Islamic Republic has faced in the past. The leaderless movement has grown stronger despite increasingly harsh repressions, relying on unprecedented solidarity between ethnic minorities, different religious groups and the solidarity of men with women.

The movement began in September after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, a Kurd from Saqez in northwestern Iran, who was arrested in Tehran by vice squad for allegedly wearing her hijab in a manner incorrect and later died in police custody. The protests in Saqez quickly spread to Tehran and other cities across the country. Now in their third month, the protests show no signs of stopping, despite the shocking violence security forces have unleashed against protesters, including savage beatings, mass arrests and indiscriminate killings of protesters, including children.

At the forefront of the protests are women and young people – high school students coming out of school on strike, women tearing off their hijabs and cutting their hair in public in mourning and defiance.

Despite earlier viral claims, the government has not sentenced the approximately 15,000 people detained during the protests to death, as Al-Jazeera explained earlier in the week. This misunderstanding likely stems from a statement signed by 227 of Iran’s 290 parliamentarians stating that protesters “waging war against God” should be dealt with in a way that would “set an example”.

“But they’re not going to execute them all,” Ali Vaez, director of the International Crisis Group’s Iran project, told Vox via email. “If the past is prelude, the regime is likely to cruelly execute some to teach others a lesson and deter them from taking to the streets.”

Yet more than 300 people have been killed in the protests. That number includes more than 50 children under the age of 18, Farnaz Fassihi of The New York Times reported on Monday. But victims and arrests are difficult to track; Social media and internet access has been severely restricted and foreign journalists cannot access the country. So far, five protesters are to be executed for participating in the uprising.

However, the government’s response to the protests is becoming more extreme; security forces have gone from using tear gas to firing at protesters with metal pellets and rubber bullets, and the bodies of several dead teenagers show signs of severe head trauma. Mass arrests, threats of executions and indiscriminate killings only fueled protesters’ calls for a new government and “death to the dictator”.

The violence could get worse, Borzou Daragahi, senior international correspondent for the Independent and senior researcher at the Atlantic Council told Vox in a telephone interview. “In the spirit of the regime, nothing is forbidden because we are doing the work of God,” he said.

Here’s how the protest movement has evolved over time

The leaderless and nameless movement began among women, long treated as second-class citizens with few rights in the Islamic Republic and remained a women-centric movement. Every day, girls and young women defy strict orders to cover their hair in public, confronting those who demand they follow the rules, even apparently heckling a member of the fearsome Basij, a paramilitary force that is part of the Corps of Iranian Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) and contributed to the violent suppression of protesters.

“It’s really touching and unprecedented even, maybe, globally, this kind of feminist angle, and it’s real,” Daragahi said. “Men support women, schoolgirls go out and protest by day, schoolboys go out and revolt against the police at night, people support each other, people cheer on women as they take off their hijab, etc. This whole feminist angle is quite singular, for a political revolution in any country.

Schoolgirls began to publicly and seriously participate in the protests in October, and in recent weeks the protests have morphed into something broader and far reaching – a call for an end to the regime from Iranians of all ethnic, gender and religious backgrounds. .

The movement is also diversifying its tactics beyond just walking down the street every day, as Santa Monica College-affiliated sociologist Elham Gheytanchi wrote for the Wilson Center this week:

The current social movement is spreading in the following way: the students of the big universities (112 universities and more) are on strike; high school students walk out of classrooms; street protests take place almost every night, especially on Wednesdays, and the traditional 40th day of the death of every “martyr” killed by security forces.

Protesters also called for boycotts of products made by companies with alleged ties to the regime, Gheytanchi wrote, including a major maker of groceries and household goods as well as Iran’s version of Amazon, Digikala. .

The effect of boycotts is such, Vaez said, “that even a rumor of a distant association with the IRGC can now ruin businesses that may have no connection to the force and have suffered for years of sanctions and endemic corruption”. Along with strikes in major industries and a loss of internet revenue due to power cuts and restrictions on services like Instagram, boycotts are likely to do even more damage to the economy – but without guarantee that they will cause the downfall of the regime.

“In a way, the boycott can only worsen the impact of the sanctions, introducing more misery,” Vaez said. “The regime has always been able to transfer economic pain onto the middle class, in the same way that Saddam in 2002 was much richer than he was in 1992 at the start of the international sanctions regime against Iraq. It took outside intervention to bring about regime change in Iraq after a decade of devastating sanctions.

Can the Iranian government stop the momentum?

Iranian society has a long history of protest, as Haleh Esfandiari and Marina Ottaway wrote for the Wilson Center last month. But the regime was able to crush previous mass movements like the 2009 and 2019 protests fairly quickly. gasoline prices in 2019.

This movement is elementary; the call is not just for reform, but a fundamental challenge to the regime’s fundamental conception of society.

“Iran is a patchwork of different sects and ethnicities, and is therefore vulnerable to the same fault lines that have dragged other countries in the region into civil war,” said Ali Vaez, Iran Project Director of the International Crisis Group to Vox via email. “But these protests are primarily driven by a widely shared sense of nationalism, not separatism. Even though the regime has tried to present them as a threat to the country’s territorial integrity and has even provoked the separatists at times by deploying a higher degree of violence in the provinces bordering Iran, where minorities reside, the movement retained its nationalist character.

But for Khamenei’s theocracy to crumble would most likely require “pressure from below and division from above,” Karim Sadjadpour wrote for Foreign Affairs this spring. The pressure from below is certainly there; despite increasing costs.

The economic misery facing Iran – the result of brutal sanctions by the United States and its allies, as well as the regime’s determination to exert influence in Syria, Lebanon, Yemen and now Russia funding proxy groups and exporting arms – is a powerful galvanizing force. With an unemployment rate of around 11.5%, people have both the incentive and the time to protest.

However, the country’s elite appear to be surviving the economic freefall and also maintaining their support and ties to the regime, Vaez said. “We haven’t seen any serious defections so far,” among the country’s well-connected and powerful upper class. Despite “the regime’s lamentable failures to improve the country’s economic well-being,” the highest levels of society have, at least publicly, refused to stand up to power.

There are cracks in the facade of the regime, Daragahi said, although they can be small and easy to miss.

“It seems the difference is between those who support repression and those who want more repression.” Vaez told Vox. The political rifts are not as extreme as they have been in past protest movements, likely due to the fact that “the system has purged the most pragmatic forces from Iranian politics and is now left with ultra- hardliners or sycophants,” he said.

But there are signs that the regime does not fully control the riot police, whom Daragahi has described as thugs or religious fanatics, putting it in a precarious position.

“People get killed because it’s a mess; they are unprofessional and they cannot control crowds properly,” Daragahi explained. “Basically, when you let the dogs out of their cages, that dynamic breaks out. No one is walking around and executing children in the streets, they are just reckless and mean, thugs, who are hired to quell this protest, they have very little experience.

Even if the regime is uncomfortable with the killing of innocent protesters, it is a major risk to condemn the security forces who commit them, as it could lead them to turn against the clerics in charge.

“The main risk is that if the theocracy proves unable to contain the protests, the Revolutionary Guards could push the clerics aside and take over,” Vaez told Vox.

And despite the horrors of mass arrests, execution threats and deaths that the regime has already carried out, the protests have only persisted, grown and evolved. “It’s already in uncharted territory,” Daragahi said, both in terms of the momentum of the movement and the reaction of the regime.

“But so far,” Vaez said, “all the measures in the regime’s old playbook have failed to crush the protests.”

]]>
COP27: Webinar Laudato si’ to encourage the action of the Church in the face of the climate crisis https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/cop27-webinar-laudato-si-to-encourage-the-action-of-the-church-in-the-face-of-the-climate-crisis/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 09:39:19 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/cop27-webinar-laudato-si-to-encourage-the-action-of-the-church-in-the-face-of-the-climate-crisis/ The European Laudato si’ Alliance is hosting a webinar to explore solutions to maximize the impact of Catholics in the environmental crisis, as the COP27 climate conference continues in Egypt. By Edoardo Giribaldi “Joining our voices in the footsteps of the words of Pope Francis.” This is the mission of the European Laudato si’ Alliance […]]]>

The European Laudato si’ Alliance is hosting a webinar to explore solutions to maximize the impact of Catholics in the environmental crisis, as the COP27 climate conference continues in Egypt.

By Edoardo Giribaldi

“Joining our voices in the footsteps of the words of Pope Francis.” This is the mission of the European Laudato si’ Alliance (ELSiA) and the webinar organized to discuss the role that the Catholic community can play in the climate emergency.

ELSiA is an organization that promotes a concept of ecological justice firmly linked to the teachings of the Church.

“Our work is based on three fundamental pillars”, explained Laura Morosini, director of programs in Europe of the Laudato si’ movement, “eco-spirituality, eco-practice and eco-vocations”.

The event was moderated by climate change journalist Lou Del Bello, who spoke with Fr. Eduardo Agosta Sacarel, Senior Advisor to the Laudato si’ Movement, and Fr. Charles Chilufya, President of the Jesuit Justice Association and Africa Ecology Network.

Role of the Church in the climate crisis

Prof. Saracel, speaking from the media zone of Sharm el-Sheik Cop27, began by noting the active position that the Vatican took in the discussion of the climate crisis at the start of this conference.

“For years the Vatican has been an observer state, with the sole duty of providing moral advice and guidance after the signing of the final resolutions,” the father said. Sacarel.

Following Pope Francis’ endorsement of the 2015 Paris Agreement related to the environmental crisis, the Vatican has officially become part of the global debate.

It’s time to act

Prof. Chilufya stressed the importance of “emphasizing the cry of the poor”, especially those in developing countries.

Speaking from Zambia, the President of the Jesuit Network for Justice and Ecology in Africa presented the example of many African populations hit by climatic disasters, such as floods, cyclones and heat waves.

He also recalled the Pope’s words in his Fratelli Tutti encyclical, emphasizing the responsibilities of modern society towards developing countries, often harmed by the excessive process of industrialization.

“It is also an ethical question,” added the father. Chilufya, “it makes us wonder, how can we all live well?”

Cultivate faith and hope

The discussion continued to illustrate the concrete actions the Church needs to take in recent years.

“As religious leaders and worshippers,” the father said. Chilufya, “we must encourage hope, in the awareness that God has given us immense power to change things”.

Catholics should think, invent and try, he urged. “At the start of the pandemic, Pope Francis called on us to imagine the future and how we could do things differently. That’s what we have to do, mobilize people and maintain their faith.

New ways of life

The first step, according to the two panelists, is the realization that we need new ways of living. “The encyclical Laudato si’Fr. Sacarel asserted, “urges us to return to traditional Christian spiritualities which essentially say that less is more”.

It means reducing the consumption of goods and reaffirming that materialistic ideals do not fulfill life. “We live on a planet with limited resources,” the father said. Chilufya asserted, “but our hearts are infinite.

The importance of temperance

Following a question posed by webinar participants, the two panelists analyzed the importance of temperance, by definition, “the virtue that moderates in us the excessive desire for sensible pleasure, keeping it within the limits assigned by reason and the faith”.

The key, according to Fr. Chilufya, is to transfer this approach into our daily lives.

“In each of us lies the need for purpose, for a sense of accomplishment,” concluded the President of the Jesuit Network for Justice and Ecology in Africa. It is up to us to direct this desire towards a simpler way of life from which everyone, including our planet, could benefit.

]]>
BYU Hosts Hazara Career Day and Provides Educational Opportunities for Youth https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/byu-hosts-hazara-career-day-and-provides-educational-opportunities-for-youth/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 20:37:49 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/byu-hosts-hazara-career-day-and-provides-educational-opportunities-for-youth/ By Hassan El Sheikh The story of the American immigrant is one that many have heard before. Throughout history, individuals have left their homelands to escape oppression, religious persecution and more to start a new life. Now the Hazara community of Afghanistan is part of that story. Coming to a country where no one speaks […]]]>

By Hassan El Sheikh

The story of the American immigrant is one that many have heard before. Throughout history, individuals have left their homelands to escape oppression, religious persecution and more to start a new life.

Now the Hazara community of Afghanistan is part of that story.

Coming to a country where no one speaks their native language or understands their culture can be difficult for refugees, but Utah Hazara and BYU are helping to make this transition a little easier.

Members of the Hazara community gathered at the Gordon B. Hinckley Visitor Center alongside students and faculty to learn how to navigate the American education system on November 4.

Education is one of the many elements of Afghan life that was taken away from their community after the Taliban took over in August 2021.

“Fifty-eight other girls had big dreams for their lives, but the Taliban turned them to ashes,” said Ghazanfar Ali, social media director for the Utah Hazara Association.

Young Hazara have career dreams and goals, some since they were children.

“Ever since I was little, people asked me, ‘How do you want to be when you grow up?’ said young Hazara Mehdia Muhammdi. “I would be, like, a doctor.”

But arriving in the United States did not mean that their journey was over. Many young Hazara encountered difficulties when they arrived.

“The first state I came here to was California and the language was the hardest part,” said young Hazara Mehdi Muhammadi.. “I didn’t know anything.”

The Utah Hazara Association helps refugees by providing translation assistance, housing and food stamps.

The event ended with traditional Afghan dishes like hummus and beef kebab, along with popular Hazara music.

While the Hazara community in the United States still has a long way to go, their experience of learning to endure hard things is what has made them such a remarkable people.

]]>
Hindu Heritage Month https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hindu-heritage-month/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 13:23:10 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hindu-heritage-month/ October was Hindu Heritage Month. PSYCHIATRIC VIEWPOINTS ON EVERYDAY NEWS Did you know October is Hindu Heritage Month? I didn’t, at least until I was part of a panel on hate and harmony at the annual meeting of American and Canadian children and adolescents in Toronto. At the end of the meeting, I saw a […]]]>

October was Hindu Heritage Month.

PSYCHIATRIC VIEWPOINTS ON EVERYDAY NEWS

Did you know October is Hindu Heritage Month? I didn’t, at least until I was part of a panel on hate and harmony at the annual meeting of American and Canadian children and adolescents in Toronto. At the end of the meeting, I saw a full page, color notice in the Toronto newspaper about “Light up Toronto with Canada Diwali Fireworks” on October 20th.

Diwali is one of many religious festivals of lights, celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains around the world. It coincides with the harvest and emphasizes new beginnings as well as the triumph of good over evil and light over darkness.

Hindu Heritage Month was launched in 2021. Its aim was to highlight Hindu heritage to the world through various educational processes. Some suggested values ​​to emphasize are inclusiveness, knowledge, family, non-violence and charity.

Globally, Hinduism is the third largest religion with approximately 15% of the world’s population and over one billion adherents. In India and Nepal, it is the vast majority. It is quite heterogeneous with many schools of thought and practices. It can be considered monotheistic, but with aspects of polytheism.

In the United States, Hindus, mainly of Indian origin, represent about 1% of the population and the fourth largest religion after Christianity, Judaism and Islam. They are generally well-educated, of higher socio-economic status, and often work in the fields of technology or medicine. Skin tones vary greatly. It is unclear if they are still considered part of collective Asian American communities.

In the volume Antisemitism and psychiatrythe chapter on “Anti-Semitism from a Hindu Psychiatric Point of View” convincingly demonstrated that there never was anti-Semitism among Hindus, perhaps the only enduring historical example of such tolerance , respect and value of the Jewish people.1 Like American Hindus, American Jews are sometimes considered a minority group in America, and sometimes not.

In the 3 volumes of the trilogy on psychiatry and the 3 largest religions in the United States, the editors and authors of the chapters have worried both about the negative intolerance and fears of Muslims and Jews, but also positive mental health impacts of religious and community support. .1-3 We need a fourth volume on psychiatry and Hinduism and the other so-called Eastern religions.

For clinicians, it is essential to obtain a solid history of the patient’s religions and spiritual beliefs as they influence well-being, attitude toward psychiatric care, and therapeutic alliance. In society, inclusiveness and unity require knowledge of important religious festivals and heritages. Consider this column a belated acknowledgment of Hindu Heritage Month.

Doctor Moffic is an award-winning psychiatrist who specializes in the cultural and ethical aspects of psychiatry. A prolific writer and speaker, he received the unique designation of Hero of Public Psychiatry from the Assembly of the American Psychiatric Association in 2002. He is an advocate for mental health issues related to climate instability, burnout professional, Islamophobia and anti-Semitism. for a better world. He sits on the editorial board of Psychiatric Times™.

References

1. Moffic HS, Peteet JR, Hankir A, Seeman MV. Antisemitism and psychiatry. Springers; 2020.

2. Moffic HS, Peteet JR, Hankir A, Awaad R. Islamophobia and psychiatry. Springers; 2019.

3. Peteet J, Moffic HS, Hankir A, Koenig HG. Christianity and psychiatry. Springers; 2021.

]]>
Hatfield parent upset religious material attached to school newsletter https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hatfield-parent-upset-religious-material-attached-to-school-newsletter/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:13:43 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hatfield-parent-upset-religious-material-attached-to-school-newsletter/ Published: 01/11/2022 20:03:26 Modified: 01/11/2022 20:03:07 HATFIELD — A member of the Hatfield community for four years, Jennifer Bogin says her family has always felt welcome in town until this fall, when promotional materials for religious education classes at the Catholic Church was attached to the school newsletter. “I feel like this was an absolutely […]]]>

Published: 01/11/2022 20:03:26

Modified: 01/11/2022 20:03:07

HATFIELD — A member of the Hatfield community for four years, Jennifer Bogin says her family has always felt welcome in town until this fall, when promotional materials for religious education classes at the Catholic Church was attached to the school newsletter.

“I feel like this was an absolutely unintended assault on my family and the way I’m raising my child,” Bogin said at a recent Hatfield school board meeting.

Upon receiving the email from Our Lady of Grace Church about its religious training programs, Bogin said, communication on the school’s mailing list showed him that some of his fears about moving to Hatfield since Northampton were coming true, including being lesbian parents raising a Jewish child. and coming to a less diverse city and not being part of the larger religious community.

But Bogin told the committee she understands that, without specific rules guiding what material can be sent home, schools cannot discriminate against any specific nonprofit, although she would prefer to see better separation from the church. and the state.

“I just want to start a conversation. I just feel like it was really upsetting for us,” Bogin said. “No matter what I don’t want my son’s backpack saying you need to be saved in second grade. That’s how we felt about it. That’s how we read it. »

Because public comment is not an action item on the agenda, the school committee could not immediately address Bogin’s concerns.

But committee chair Christy Boudreau said how and what schools share in updates from sources outside the school will be something her policy subcommittee will consider at an upcoming meeting.

“The district has a consistent practice of relaying information from local nonprofit and municipal organizations to families,” Boudreau said.

The current policy that allows a wide range of nonprofit organizations to use the schools mailing list was also explained by Superintendent Michael Wood in his initial response to Bogin’s concerns last month.

“I was aware of and approved the distribution of the flyer,” Wood wrote to her. “Hatfield Public Schools does not discriminate in the dissemination of non-profit information, nor do we endorse the content of these flyers. My mistake was not to make this clearer to recipients.

It is the first time Bogin can recall a flier returning to Hatfield causing him such anguish, after his son started Hatfield as a second year three years ago. The previous three emails this fall were about parent-teacher association events and other school-sponsored activities.

Prior to the meeting, Bogin contacted State Representative Lindsay Sabadosa, D-Northampton, who told him that the United States Supreme Court’s May unanimous decision on Shurtleff v. Boston, where the justices ruled that a Christian flag could fly outside the city of Boston Hall, is what guides Hatfield officials. This decision effectively said that if the policy is that all institutions have equal access to a forum, religious institutions cannot be prevented from having that same equal access.

“While Hatfield’s policy is that all outside groups may post to the mailing list and have equal access to it, religious institutions may use the mailing list as long as they, and all other posters, abide by the rules and regulations established by the superintendent or school committee,” Sabadosa said.

Bogin said in an interview with the Gazette that she loves Hatfield and that her son thrives in the schools, but she would still like to see a policy developed on contacting parents, so that no child or family feels excluded in the same way.

“These are microaggressions that we need to be aware of, especially when directed at our children,” Bogin said. “I feel like it’s about being alienated from my community.

Scott Merzbach can be contacted at smerzbach@gazettenet.com.

]]>
Hundreds of international NGOs closed in Nicaragua https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hundreds-of-international-ngos-closed-in-nicaragua/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 02:07:46 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hundreds-of-international-ngos-closed-in-nicaragua/ The regime has accumulated more than 2,500 national and international NGOs eliminated since November 2018. The list continues to grow. Of the canceled international NGOs, 41% were from the United States and were engaged in development assistance in Nicaragua. By confidential HAVANA TIMES — Daniel Ortega’s guillotine has revoked the legal status of 287 international […]]]>
The regime has accumulated more than 2,500 national and international NGOs eliminated since November 2018. The list continues to grow.

Of the canceled international NGOs, 41% were from the United States and were engaged in development assistance in Nicaragua.

By confidential

HAVANA TIMES — Daniel Ortega’s guillotine has revoked the legal status of 287 international nonprofit organizations in the past 14 months. Most of these NGOs were involved in issues of development, health, education, religion and social progress, reveals a Confidential data analysis.

The eliminated organizations came from 34 countries on all continents. However, 41% of them came from the United States. The cancellation decrees published in the Official Journal reveal that 35 of these canceled NGOs had between 21 and 40 years of activity in Nicaragua, 63 were between 11 and 20 years old and less than 20 were less than ten years old.

The revoked legal statute was implemented by Franya Urey Blandon, executive director of the Nonprofit Registration and Control Directorate. Of the total number of international NGOs closed, 90% of them were closed between June and October 2022.

The month with the most cancellations

October was the month in which Daniel Ortega’s regime carried out the most cancellations of operating registrations. The latest batch came on October 27, 2022, when Urey Blandon ordered the closure of 67 international nonprofits and 33 national NGOs for allegedly failing to meet their obligations.

They have been accused of failing to provide details of their donations, the source of funds and the ultimate recipient. As well as for not revealing the identity with the names, passports, exact addresses and telephone numbers of their donors.

In total, Daniel Ortega’s regime revoked the legal status of 2,581 national and international non-profit organizations between November 2018 and October 2022. 97.3% of them were abolished during this year.

It is estimated that with the closure of these spaces, more than a million Nicaraguans who have benefited from their programs will be affected, another two thousand will lose their jobs and the losses due to the closure of NGOs could exceed 200 million dollars per year. year, according to the forecasts of the Inter-American Dialogue.

international NGOs

Among the American organizations, the following stand out: the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, which works on questions of democracy; Fabretto’s Children’s Foundation, on educational issues; Chacocente Project, on social development; Granada Street Kids, on education; The Sunrise Foundation, on humanitarian aid; Clinica Verde, on health issues; and several religious organizations such as: International Christian Corporate Alliance, Nicaraguan Christian Relief Ministries.

Spain is the second country with the most non-profit organizations in Nicaragua that have been cancelled. The most important are: OXFAM Intermon Foundation, Peace and Third World Association, Greenworld and Environment Association, Association Bread of Life for Nicaragua, Mundubat Foundation-Mundubat Fundazioa.

The other three countries with the most NGOs in Nicaragua are Italy (23), Germany (14) and Costa Rica (10). These include the Italian Association for Solidarity among Peoples, the International Christian Peace Service, the Water for the World Foundation, the Rosa de Saron Christian Mission, and the Nicaraguan Refugees and Exiles Foundation.

The list includes eight NGOs from France, seven from Canada, six from the Netherlands, six from Belgium, five from Panama, five from England, Honduras, Denmark and Austria. Four in Sweden and Norway, three in Venezuela, Switzerland and two in the UK, Puerto Rico, Mexico and Guatemala.

Twelve others came from Peru, Luxembourg, Ireland, Slovakia, El Salvador, Colombia, China, Chile, Belize, Argentina and Afghanistan.

These 47 NGOs were involved in development issues, 22 had a religious orientation, including evangelical churches; 19 focused on health, 18 on social development, ten on cooperation, such as the Spanish Catalan Fund for Development Cooperation with Nicaragua and the Frankfurt-Granada Friendship Association in Germany.

Nine of the canceled NGOs worked on education, six on the environment, six on humanitarian aid, five on universities, three on international solidarity, two on refugees and exiles and human rights.

Violation of freedom of association denounced before the IACHR

This week, 18 human rights organizations denounced before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) the situation of violation of freedom of association and human rights in Nicaragua. They said that out of more than 2,500 NGOs eliminated by the regime, at least 43 were raided and their property expropriated.

“The Commission and its Special Rapporteurs have declared the gravity of the situation in the country a priority for them, stressing that these human rights violations deserve maximum condemnation. They also recalled that the country is experiencing a “regime of terror” which prevents its citizens from organizing to defend their rights”, they explained in a press release.

The organizations that participated in this complaint are: the Nicaraguan Center for Human Rights (CENIDH), the Center for Legal Assistance to Indigenous Peoples (CALPI), the Center for Information and Health Counseling (CISAS), the Center for Studies and Social Promotion (CEPS), Human Rights Collective Nicaragua Never Again, Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) and the Coordinating Body of NGOs Working for Children and Adolescents (CODENI).

In addition, the Forum on Education and Human Development (FEDH-IPN), Foundation for the Conservation and Development of Southeast Nicaragua (Fundacion del Rio), Hagamos Democracia (HADEMOS), Las Segovias Leadership Institute ( ILLS), Institute for Development and Democracy (IPADE), International Institute on Race, Equality and Human Rights (Race and Equality), Mesoamerican Initiative of Women Human Rights Defenders (IM-Defensoras), Nicaraguan Network on Democracy and Local Development (Red Local), Municipal Promotion and Development Popol Na Foundation (Popol Na), Autonomous Women’s Movement (MAM) and Nicaraguan Society of General Medicine (Sonimeg).

Read more about Nicaragua here on Havana Times

]]>
Stonington BOE reinforces the need for inclusion and votes to protect the use of LGBQT+ flags | stonington https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/stonington-boe-reinforces-the-need-for-inclusion-and-votes-to-protect-the-use-of-lgbqt-flags-stonington/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 00:55:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/stonington-boe-reinforces-the-need-for-inclusion-and-votes-to-protect-the-use-of-lgbqt-flags-stonington/ STONINGTON – Rainbow flags in support of the LGBQT+ community are meant to be a symbol of inclusion, not a political point of view, and should not be removed from classrooms or excluded from relevant teaching, members of the Board of Education made it clear Tuesday night in voting to allow flags and review the […]]]>

STONINGTON – Rainbow flags in support of the LGBQT+ community are meant to be a symbol of inclusion, not a political point of view, and should not be removed from classrooms or excluded from relevant teaching, members of the Board of Education made it clear Tuesday night in voting to allow flags and review the district’s discrimination policy.

The school board voted unanimously to accept a recommendation from Superintendent of Schools Mary Anne Butler that called for flags to be permitted as an inclusive symbol and for flags to be used in appropriate instructions, before voting to unanimously on a resolution to review its policies and update them to protect everyone. The review effort, which will be led by a subcommittee with an update in 30 days, is designed to support the protection of students’ rights to gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation, the members said.

In issuing a statement of support for the LGBQT+ community, Board of Education member Heidi Simmons made it clear that the issue is non-partisan and that the district remains committed to providing a welcoming and inclusive environment for all.

“A lot of these flags were giveaways from the Alliance for Acceptance Club to represent inclusion,” said Simmons, a Republican. “Removing these symbols is punitive to a community that has experienced painful rejection in the past.”

Tuesday’s support votes marked the latest step in a process that began weeks ago after a complaint was filed by a parent, according to an earlier press release from Deputy Superintendent Tim Smith.

In order to investigate the issue and make an appropriate decision, messages have been exchanged with the teacher and school administrator of the affected building, SEA President Michael Freeman said in a statement to the end of the meeting in order to clarify the schedule.

Freeman said the correspondence led to a discussion with six teachers in particular and a decision was made to temporarily remove the flags until the issue could be resolved. He took blame for miscommunication in the process and promised to continue to keep lines of communication open and to encourage transparency and discourse.

Confusion over the request led to reports and discussions among members of the Stonington Education Association, who expressed concern that they too would be asked to remove the flags from the classroom.

“I want to make it clear that I have never issued a universal directive to remove the pride flags or any other flags from the classrooms of Stonington. I had asked the building administrators to deal with the teachers to allow enough space and time for parents’ interpretation of current school board policy,” Butler explained. “All parents deserve the respect to be heard, even when opinions on social issues differ. It is important to offer respect to all.

Following extensive review and consultation with two separate law firms, Butler said it was determined that the flags, both historically and in context, were not political statements, but rather “a statement of diversity, equity and inclusion that crosses party lines and is non-partisan.”

However, not everyone at the meeting was happy with the decision.

Several parents have spoken out against the presence of group flags representing sexual expression or views in classrooms, especially at the elementary level. Parents should have greater control over shared views and what should be considered “age-appropriate”, they said, and support for pride flags could create learning environments uncomfortable for students from other backgrounds.

A parent, who did not share his name before speaking from the podium, criticized the school board for expressing opinions without hearing the public first, and questioned why religious views were not considered in the board’s decision. She was backed by two other parents who said the decision imposes opinions and views that are in fact religious or political on families and students.

“It has been deemed political elsewhere and it has an impact on the classroom. All students should feel open and welcome, all should be safe and accepted. The only way to achieve this goal is to keep our classrooms neutral,” the woman said. “If there is no flag, is the classroom suddenly no longer a safe space? What about those with specific religious beliefs? Why should their views not be accepted? »

Many more, including several students, spoke out in favor of the support. Simmons also explained his reasoning for supporting discussion of the history of the flag, which was specifically designed as “rainbow flags”, a term originally introduced with the flag in 1978 by the gay designer and political activist Gilbert Baker.

The purpose of the flag was not to promote one group of views, but to offer a show of support and unity to anyone from all spectrums of sexual orientation and gender identification. The flag’s intent was never political, she said, regardless of how some have used it in recent years.

Simmons and board member Kevin Agnello said they only see this vote as the first step in the process and encouraged a thorough review of the policy to ensure no one is discriminated against.

SEA members also expressed strong support for the resolutions and the ongoing review, with Freeman issuing a written statement ahead of the start of Tuesday’s meeting.

“It is the position of the Stonington Education Association that these flags are NOT partisan political speech and therefore do not fall within the current policies of the Board of Education,” he said. “SEA views the inclusion of LGBTQ+ flags in a classroom as a symbol of acceptance and inclusion, and emphasizes the importance of supporting all students in the community.

“We all need to support efforts to achieve inclusion in our schools. SEA and its members have a deep and longstanding commitment to our students and social rights, and we are committed to doing all we can to ensure that our schools are safe and caring environments that help ALL students reach their full potential. “, he continued. .

]]>
Australian life | The Spectator Australia https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/australian-life-the-spectator-australia/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 21:22:28 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/australian-life-the-spectator-australia/ I have been barracks for the Essendon football team since I was young. Among my childhood memorabilia is a collection of football cards featuring the champion players of the day – Barry Davis, Russell Blew, Jack Clarke and Ken Fraser. I continued to follow the Bombers over the decades, through years of victory and periods […]]]>

I have been barracks for the Essendon football team since I was young. Among my childhood memorabilia is a collection of football cards featuring the champion players of the day – Barry Davis, Russell Blew, Jack Clarke and Ken Fraser. I continued to follow the Bombers over the decades, through years of victory and periods of defeat – including through the so-called “supplement saga”.

Australians have adopted football players from all walks of life, ethnicities and faiths. Like the millions of others who follow the game, I am interested in the skills of the players and their values ​​of courage, perseverance, sportsmanship and humility. This latter quality often seems lost in the modern game, but football fans still respect players who are not only skillful, but modest. Watch the reception of newly retired Geelong captain, Joel Selwood after this year’s Grand Final.

When Sir Donald Bradman was inducted as the first member of the Sports Australia Hall of Fame, he said: “When considering the stature of an athlete, or for that matter any person, I attach great importance to certain qualities, which, in my opinion, are essential in addition to know-how. They are that the person leads his life with dignity, with integrity and above all with modesty. These are completely compatible with pride, l ambition and the will to compete. I like to see people with personality and character, but I totally hate the philosophy of those misguided people who think that arrogance is a virtue. It is only supported by the public – not appreciated.

How many of us who – reluctantly – continue to cheer on Nick Kyrios, wish he would grow up and show greater sportsmanship and humility?

Essendon’s recent treatment of its newly selected CEO Andrew Thorburn by the club’s board reveals a new ugliness in Australian society. Indeed, Thorburn was sacked because he retained a governance role in a Christian church, whose pastor had made statements supporting Orthodox Christian views on abortion and marriage in a 2013 sermon found on the site. Church website. There are hundreds of sermons and resources on the website – many of which are podcasts that would require hours of listening to find the passages in question. Either the sportswriter who wrote the original story – or more likely someone else – scoured these resources to find the few sentences complained of. Mr. Thorburn has received an ultimatum from the club: leave your church or lose your job. Where was due process, let alone respect for freedom of association and religion? Despite his religious affiliations, Thorburn had run a major bank that had supported diversity programs, including the AFL’s “Pride” matches.

Instead, the Essendon board effectively sacked Thorburn. The explanation given was appalling: ‘I want to stress that neither the board nor Andrew were aware of the comments from the 2013 sermon until we read them this morning,’ the club chairman said , David Barham. The president admitted that it would have been illegal to ask Thorburn about his religious views before employing him, but acted once he later learned of the sermons. Apparently these religious views had not stopped Mr Thorburn from leading the external review of the club’s football department, including the search for a new chief executive!

Bigotry was rampant in Australia a century ago. I remember my father, born in 1911, telling me about the fights between Catholic and Protestant school children in the small country town when he was growing up. It was an attitude that my parents – one Catholic, the other Anglican – had rejected when they married in 1949. Their union encountered opposition from their respective families. As children, we were raised to judge people by their character and actions, not by their religious, ethnic or other beliefs. Bigotry never completely disappeared, but it declined significantly after World War II. Unfortunately, it has reappeared over the past decade, partly as a result of neo-Marxist influence in our education system, which has now spread to most levels of the public, professional and corporate sectors. The so-called “wokeism” exposes the new intolerance. It’s no surprise that this culture has spread to big sport, including the AFL, as the governing bodies are filled with executives from companies where the culture is prevalent. The “diversity” advocated by the AFL is very selective. The Essendon saga blatantly displays a totalitarian drive and a new intolerance, especially towards Christians.

One of the foundations of the plural liberal politics that we have been fortunate enough to inherit is being undermined by the new totalitarians. Three centuries ago, philosophers like John Locke sought to define the limits of political power in relation to beliefs. In his Letter Concerning Toleration of 1689, Locke sought to distinguish the affairs of civil government from those of religion. Writing at a time when controversy surrounded the idea that Catholics should be able to practice their religion in Protestant England, or that Jews or Muslims enjoyed religious freedom in a Christian nation, Locke argued that the state and the Church had distinct functions. He sought to find ways for people of different religious beliefs to live together.

As the late Jonathan Sacks wrote, tolerance “aims not so much for truth but for peace.” It is a political necessity and not a religious imperative, and it arises when people have experienced the alternative: the war of all against all. Hence the political separation of faith and power; of Church and State. In the words of Thomas Jefferson, “No one will be compelled to support a religious worship, but everyone will be free to profess their religious opinions”. This separation does not resolve religious differences, including with those who have no religious beliefs. The state permits diversity of opinions, beliefs and practices in the name of national peace and social harmony, not religious preference.

As Sacks warned, “when political liberalism is combined with moral relativism, it reconnects morality and politics, which liberalism is supposed to avoid.” Religious belief is now swept away from the political realm, as evidenced by the gratuitous interventions of the Victorian Prime Minister. Rather than employing rhetoric to unite and heal, the Prime Minister’s words provided balm to the bigoted and intolerant who hide behind their woke agenda; and allowed authoritarian excesses. Why does the Prime Minister’s verdict of guilty by association for Mr. Thorburn not apply equally to himself, who claims to be a Catholic?

I doubt the Essendon board understood what they were getting into when they hastily dispatched Andrew Thorburn; it was rather a thoughtless application of the zeitgeist. His actions demonstrate how the pillar of tolerance has been eroded in Western civilization. This way leads back to the “war of all against all”.

]]>
Hallmark Channel’s Crown Media Family Networks Officially Rebranded https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hallmark-channels-crown-media-family-networks-officially-rebranded/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 16:52:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/hallmark-channels-crown-media-family-networks-officially-rebranded/ Crown Family Media Networks has announced that it has officially changed its name to Hallmark Media, which encompasses Hallmark Channel, Hallmark Movies & Mysteries, Hallmark Drama and Hallmark Movies Now. The move will more closely align the network with its parent company, Hallmark Cards. “The iconic Hallmark brand and our purpose-driven mission to help people […]]]>

Crown Family Media Networks has announced that it has officially changed its name to Hallmark Media, which encompasses Hallmark Channel, Hallmark Movies & Mysteries, Hallmark Drama and Hallmark Movies Now. The move will more closely align the network with its parent company, Hallmark Cards.

“The iconic Hallmark brand and our purpose-driven mission to help people lead caring, connected lives full of meaningful moments will guide everything we do,” said Wonya Lucas, president and CEO, in a statement. communicated. “The beloved Hallmark brand is associated with positivity, kindness, celebrations and traditions, all of which are the foundations of our content and core values. With these attributes as our foundation, it only makes sense that the Hallmark name our company to be in the lead with the Hallmark brand.”

The rebranding was first revealed during the Television Critics Association’s summer press tour, with Lucas and Executive Vice President of Programming Lisa Hamilton Daly explaining that the change will also tie into future plans. of the company, including the launch of Mahogany, partnerships with Crayola, and an increase in diversity, both on-screen and off-screen.

]]>