Catholic history – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 18:03:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T154232.929.png Catholic history – Catholics Come Home Boston http://catholicscomehomeboston.org/ 32 32 Progress must never trump care, says Pope Francis https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/progress-must-never-trump-care-says-pope-francis/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 17:51:13 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/progress-must-never-trump-care-says-pope-francis/ Although scientists have made great strides in medicine, genuine care and listening to those in pain should always be at the forefront of any therapy, Pope Francis said. “Patients are always more important than their illnesses, and for this reason, no therapeutic approach can ignore listening to the patient, his story, his anxieties and his […]]]>

Although scientists have made great strides in medicine, genuine care and listening to those in pain should always be at the forefront of any therapy, Pope Francis said.

“Patients are always more important than their illnesses, and for this reason, no therapeutic approach can ignore listening to the patient, his story, his anxieties and his fears”, wrote the Pope in his message for the World Day of the Sick 2022, which the Catholic Church celebrates on February 11, feast of Our Lady of Lourdes.

Care that respects the “dignity and frailties” of each patient is particularly necessary when “recovery is not possible”, he added.

“It is always possible to console; it is always possible to make you feel a closeness that is more interested in the person than in their pathology. For this reason, I hope that the training given to health workers will enable them to develop a capacity for listening and relating to others, ”Pope Francis wrote in his message, which was published on January 4.

Reflecting on Christ’s call in Luke 6:36 to “be merciful”, Pope Francis focused on the need to accompany those who suffer “on a path of charity”.

Mercy, he said, “expresses the very nature of God” in that he “takes care of us with the strength of a father and the tenderness of a mother.”

Many sick people, especially during the current pandemic, “have spent the last part of their earthly life in solitude, in an intensive care unit, assisted by generous caregivers, yet far from their loved ones and the most important people in the world. their life. lives, ”noted the Pope.

“This helps us to see how important it is the presence at our side of witnesses of the charity of God, who, like Jesus, very mercy of the Father, pour the balm of consolation and the wine of hope on the wounds of the sick. “

Pope Francis thanked the healthcare workers who went out of their way to care for the sick as a mission “carried out with love and competence, (which) transcends the limits of your profession”.

“Your hands, which touch the suffering flesh of Christ, can be a sign of the merciful hands of the Father,” he said. “Be aware of the great dignity of your profession, as well as the responsibility that it entails. “

Pope Francis said pastoral health care ministry provides an “indispensable service” and that all Christians are called to offer “closeness to God” to the sick and suffering.


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Sunday reflection with Fr. Robin Gibbons – January 2, 2022 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/sunday-reflection-with-fr-robin-gibbons-january-2-2022/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 23:59:26 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/sunday-reflection-with-fr-robin-gibbons-january-2-2022/ Second Sunday of Christmas “No one has ever seen God; it is the Only Begotten who is closest to the heart of the Father, who made it known ”. (Jn 1:18) These words of John at the end of our Gospel this Sunday, catch me off guard, not because I do not believe them, but […]]]>

Second Sunday of Christmas

“No one has ever seen God;

it is the Only Begotten who is closest to the heart of the Father,

who made it known ”. (Jn 1:18)

These words of John at the end of our Gospel this Sunday, catch me off guard, not because I do not believe them, but because I know them in my heart, and yet I need time and time. space to think about how I came to understand this truth through the ‘only son’. You see, I’m not an evangelical who focuses a lot on the direct and emotional encounter with Jesus as Lord and Savior, so my search for Christ, as many suspects, is through hints and guesses, by trusting in the encounter that we have in the Word and the Sacraments and seeking to know the Lord in what I am now realizing has been my constant struggle to live the Beatitudes and the great Commandment.

We have been given many different ways of knowing Christ, all of them are rooted in the Gospel, we hear them proclaimed to us in the scriptures, as Catholic Christians we instinctively make many of these encounters our own. They are part of our faith DNA, they belong to us as part of our travel kit on the only royal road which is narrow but leads to eternal life. I take great comfort in the fact that Jesus understands that human beings are rightly diverse in personality and gifts, but that this variety is a gift of bonding, for in baptism it becomes familial. As we are part of “His” family, we also belong to this Pauline metaphor of the Body as different parts but always one in Christ, our head, our cornerstone, our way, the truth and the life (Eph1: 5, 6. Col 2,19.I Cor 6,12,13,14) Each of us will discover our particular ways of meeting Jesus, but there is a particular way that I understand Christ among us that I wish to share, the poet and the artist in me comes back to it over and over again, but anyone who knows love will understand exactly what it is.

Let me show you. In this Christmas season, the different feasts bring us continuously to the theme of Christ as the light who has come into our world and our lives, John gives it to us in these enchantingly beautiful cadences:

“In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind.

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not conquered him.

The real light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world.

The Word was made flesh and made his home among us.

We have seen his glory, the glory of the only begotten Son, come from the Father, full of grace and truth. (Jn 1: 4-5,9,14) Now we are all well aware that the imagery of the One God cannot present us with anything other than guesses, because no one can see God yet! Christ is the way towards this realization of meeting, because in the Christian tradition we recognize the persons of the Triune God and find our way to know this Being through Christ, but also the charism of the Holy Spirit. Light, shine, something greater than our perception helps us. Here in the feasts of the Nativity we find echoes of this light as a star, shine, luminosity, another way of seeing beyond human sight. Byzantine tradition sings this Kondakion at the Great Matins of Theophany: “You have revealed yourself to the world today;

and your light, O Lord, has set its seal on us.
We recognize you and cry out to you:
You have come and you have revealed yourself, O Unapproachable Light. In a way, this deeply poetic but theological hymn brings us together in Christ, the following Oikos tells us more by showing us what it means for human life:

‘As the prophet predicted,
a great light, Christ, shone on the Galilee of the Gentiles,
over the land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali.
A people living in darkness saw a great light shine from Bethlehem.
The Sun of Justice, the Lord born of Mary, casts its rays on all who have lived on the earth.
Come therefore, 0 naked children of Adam, and let us put on him to warm us.
For the Light that no one can approach, That which is a protection and a cloak for the naked,
the Light to those who are in darkness has appeared and has been revealed today. ‘ (Oikos of the Great Matins of the Theophany)

This is the real sense of wonder that we find in this gospel of John, reaching out to us as we begin a new year, but it is also there in a more concise form, looking us straight into the second reading of it. ‘Ephesians. The true Light has come to us who are the elect of God:

‘Before the world was made, he chose us, chose us in Christ,

to be holy and spotless, and to live for love in his presence,

determining that we are to become his adopted sons and daughters, through Jesus Christ

for its own purposes ”. (Eph 1: 4-5)

Keep this text as a symbol of your New Year’s resolution to live out your faith in the light and truth as children of the Most High. Amen

I wish you all a very happy new year.

Lectio

From the Lucenarium sung at Vespers in the Ambrosian rite

that the lamps are on.

V. For you light my lamp, oh Lord

R. My God, light up my darkness

V. For in you I will be delivered from temptation

R. My God, light up my darkness

V. For you light my lamp, oh Lord

R. My God, light up my darkness

Pick up from Epiphany Vigil (Ambrosian Rite)

O God, who on that day revealed your only begotten Son to the Gentiles by the guidance of a star, grant with mercy that we who already know you by faith, may be led to behold the beauty of your glory. Through the same our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son, * who lives and reigns with You, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, One God for ever and ever.

Extract from a Homily of Paul VI

Christmas midnight mass

December 24, 1967

… Here, it is no longer us who seek to ascend towards God, it is God who descends towards us, to make us ascend towards him, to free us and save us. It is God who takes the initiative, God who breaks the fabric of human history. This is the “good news” – (this is the meaning of the Greek word euangelos) – which is announced today to all the earth.

The Gospel is “the new” par excellence, one might say, the only real novelty that has ever been verified in the long and laborious spiritual history of mankind. To the weariness, to the aging of the pagan world, Christ brings something entirely new: liberation and salvation from on high. He frees us from ourselves, our basic misery, our bad inclinations, his sins and our vices, and makes us a new person, associated with his divine life.

Saint Paul, incomparable cantor of this liberation of humanity by Christ, will cry out in a transport of gratitude and love: “he loved me and he gave himself up for me!” (Gal. 2, 20). This is because everyone is now personally concerned. It is not to a generic and abstract humanity that salvation is offered, it is to each person in particular; it is my needs, my desires, my deepest aspirations that Christ comes to fulfill. And the new energies that it places at the heart of humanity will exert their beneficial influence on the whole of society. Our modern world tormented by so many distressing problems, this world where we work, where we suffer, where we aspire to peace: let us turn to the Child of the crèche, let us welcome his message! It is for us the way of salvation, happiness and true peace. It is a new hope which dawns on the world, it is the announcement of an endless plenitude and joy!

Keywords: Sunday Reflection, Father Robin Gibbons

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Marlboro’s No.9 Men’s Basketball Makes History, Wins First WOBM Title (PHOTOS) https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/marlboros-no-9-mens-basketball-makes-history-wins-first-wobm-title-photos/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 04:10:00 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/marlboros-no-9-mens-basketball-makes-history-wins-first-wobm-title-photos/ Senior Jack seidler sat on the floor after a post-game photo at RWJBarnabas Health Arena on Thursday night with the WOMB Christmas Classic Championship within reach and left a simple but meaningful line: “It feels good to win.” After two straight years of grief, Marlboro had something special to celebrate. The Mustangs, No.9 in NJ.com’s […]]]>

Senior Jack seidler sat on the floor after a post-game photo at RWJBarnabas Health Arena on Thursday night with the WOMB Christmas Classic Championship within reach and left a simple but meaningful line: “It feels good to win.”

After two straight years of grief, Marlboro had something special to celebrate.

The Mustangs, No.9 in NJ.com’s Top 20, defeated No.12 Red Bank Catholic, 61-58, in a two-way battle of Shore Conference powers and made history. It’s only December and there is a lot of ball to play, but winning this title at the start of the season is something this team will never forget.

This is the first time Marlboro has won a tournament championship. Period.

“These guys are so special and they deserve it so much,” said Marlboro coach Michael Nausedas. “With the adversity they went through I knew they would dig deep and from the moment we left the locker room we knew we were going to win this game. There was no way we would lose.

Marlboro and Red Bank Catholic traded blows throughout the first half, taking turns picking up the momentum of the game in a showdown between two of the state’s top teams.

At the end of the first quarter, Marlboro was leading by three points.

Red Bank Catholic turned things around in the second to lead 30-28 at the half. The Caseys were in good shape and feeling great for the first 16 minutes, especially how their defense managed to contain Marlboro superstar Seidler and the top guard. Jonathan spatola.

Each of these players averaged 20 points per game last year.

They combined for just seven points in the first half here.

Senior Zack Molod took over, however, finding an early rhythm, starting with 10 of Marlboro’s 14 points in the first quarter. He added seven more points before halftime, keeping the Mustangs within striking distance as he scored 17 of his 19 points in the first half.

“From day one of training this year (Zack) hasn’t missed a beat,” said Nausedas. “The kid has been shooting so well from practice and when he catches fire, nothing stops him. He made two faults today and we thought about taking him out, but he said, ‘Coach, no. Let me in. I knew he was going to be a great player this year. He was the kind of guy no one knew, but now they know it.

If Marlboro was to fend off a talented RBC team, he needed their stars to shine.

Red Bank Catholic came out and struck the first shot of the second half, but then Seidler and Spatola scored back-to-back buckets to put Marlboro back the lead. Mustangs never hung around again.

Seidler really started to feel it in the third quarter, scoring 10 of his 16 points in that frame. He scored a 3 point to give Marlboro their biggest lead of the night and handed his team to six points with another deep ball. This one really got Seidler moving as he raised three fingers as he came back on defense.

Spatola also came to life in this neighborhood and carried it over to the fourth.

The senior has scored nine of his game-high 20 points in the final eight minutes. Spatola is only 5’8 ” tall, but he moves so well with the ball in his hands and has a unique ability to dribble, cut, create space and shoot over defenders and straight. in the net. This has been on display down the stretch.

“Our team has a lot of experience and we’ve been playing together since the third year,” said Spatola. “We know each other so well. It was a great atmosphere and we love to play in these great competitive games. We are all ready to step in when the team needs us.

Elders Vincent spatola and Jay ratner completed training and came up with winning games for Marlboro. The Mustangs’ starting five-man suit was on the field for 31 of the 32 minutes, but you never could tell from how this team held up late in the game.

Red Bank Catholic hasn’t made it easy.

Senior Cyril Arvanitis was electric from the 3 point range and finished with 14 points, while the second Zach Meeks found its way to the rim and added 14 more. CJ Ruoff developed different ways of scoring and ended the night with 13, senior Alex Bauman also made big plays and added seven, and a second Gioacchino Panzini increased by eight points.

Red Bank Catholic trailed for most of the second half but continued to push their way into the game. The Caseys were led by a single basket eight times and were left with the ball and a chance to take the lead in the dying minutes of the game. It could have gone both ways at that point.

Molod did manage a steal on the defensive side, however.

After a failed attempt on the counterattack, Seidler managed an offensive rebound and gave the ball underneath to Jon Spatola, who came up strong and made it a four-point game. Meeks responded on the other end, but late free throws from Seidler and Spatola sealed Marlboro’s victory.

“It was awesome,” Seidler said. “We’ve been through so much grief over the past few years and finally having one feels good. Hopefully this is the first in a long series for us this season. We wanted it more today and everyone contributed. It was very fun.”

Last winter, Marlboro advanced to the Shore Conference final and faced the undefeated Manasquan. The Mustangs came in as underdogs, finding a place in the game after a surprise win over Ranney in the semifinals. Marlboro proved he belonged from start to finish and left it all on the floor.

The Mustangs narrowly missed, Manasquan winning a layup that beat the buzzer.

That ending opened up an injury the year before when Marlboro fell to South Brunswick, 72-71, in the section final, losing in a last-second layup in the championship game. These moments snatched titles the Mustangs dreamed of. Now they’re finally bringing one home to Marlboro.

It’s the start of the season and it might just be a holiday tournament, but for the Mustangs it was the perfect way to close 2021. And Marlboro can’t wait to see what the future holds. in 2022.

“We have just broken the fate of the championship,” said Nausedas. “In every championship game we played, we lost on the buzzer. This is really great, but we are not finished. These guys want more. This is the very first championship; Marlboro didn’t win anything. This is our first title. Our goal list is long, but we’ve hit our first half goals so far, and we’re really excited.

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Brandon Gould can be reached at bgould@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on twitter @BrandonGouldHS.



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Sixty years later, “Black Like Me” is still relevant for the Catholic Church https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/sixty-years-later-black-like-me-is-still-relevant-for-the-catholic-church/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 16:47:05 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/sixty-years-later-black-like-me-is-still-relevant-for-the-catholic-church/ In recent months, a certain slice of the conservative media has worked to arouse outrage against critical race theory. Unsurprisingly, many of these attacks show little or no awareness of the content of critical race theory and the issues the CRT raises. Attackers also don’t seem to know that CRT is not a part of […]]]>

In recent months, a certain slice of the conservative media has worked to arouse outrage against critical race theory. Unsurprisingly, many of these attacks show little or no awareness of the content of critical race theory and the issues the CRT raises. Attackers also don’t seem to know that CRT is not a part of most elementary and high school curricula and is only covered in very few college courses. In this environment of indignation aroused, some whites claim to be victims. These attacks make an honest discussion of race in America even more difficult. Understanding racism today requires understanding the history of slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and discrimination and seeing the lingering effects that haunt our nation, both in the attitudes of many and in systemic inequalities. found in the criminal justice system, police, housing, education and health care.

Many white readers were shocked to hear the details in Black like me. But African Americans didn’t need his book; they knew what was going on.

This honest discussion of race for many whites is long overdue. Some were hoping it would come after the 2014 protests in Ferguson, Missouri, or with Colin Kaepernick kneeling in 2016, or with nine minutes of George Floyd choking in 2020. The fabricated outrage against the CRT makes it even more so unlikely to happen. .

Sixty years ago, in 1961, John Howard Griffin (1920-1980) published Black like me educate whites on how African Americans were treated in the South under Jim Crow, the system of laws and customs that took away most rights, privileges and freedoms from African Americans and treated them like second-class citizens . Although Jim Crow first evolved in the Southern States, African Americans in the Northern States experienced similar discrimination. Many white readers were shocked to hear the details of Griffin’s popular book. Many could not believe that in a good and decent America such things actually happened. But African Americans didn’t need his book; they knew what was going on.

Griffon’s life

Born in 1920, John Howard Griffin grew up in Dallas, Texas, and he grew to love music from his classical pianist mother. As a young man, he studied in France, developing a deep interest in Gregorian chant and monasticism. At the end of the 1930s, he helped Jews flee France. He spent three years during World War II in the South Pacific in the Army Air Corps; he was injured by a shell explosion and lost most of his sight.

Upon returning to the United States, he ended up going completely blind. Over time, he married and had four children. He converted to Catholicism in 1952 and befriended Catholic figures such as the philosopher Jacques Maritain and the Trappist monk Thomas Merton. The same year as his conversion, Griffin published his first novel, The devil rides outside. He will end up producing a dozen books.

After 10 years of blindness, his sight returned. Once he regained his sight, he resumed his interest in photography.

The Church and the Black Man exposes the issues around race and the Catholic Church that are still playing out today.

In 1969 Griffin published The Church and the Negro, a little book giving his candid look at the Catholic response to racism in America. Some Catholics were unhappy with his honesty. For example, he describes how Catholic sisters who took part in the 1965 Selma march for the right to vote were accused of being prostitutes, and how priests who defended racial justice were often harassed or seen their reputation ruined.

The Church and the Black Man is still worth reading today, as it exposes issues around the race and the Catholic Church that still play out today. How many parishes in suburban areas have been built in response to the flight of whites from downtown areas? Are there any parishes today where priests are afraid to broach the subject of Catholic teaching on race and racism?

After Thomas Merton’s death in 1968, Griffin was appointed his official biographer. However, Griffin’s poor health prevented the completion of this project. He has almost completed a book on Merton’s later years, published posthumously under the title Follow the ecstasy: Thomas Merton, The Hermitage Years, 1965-1968.

John Howard Griffin died in 1980 from complications from diabetes (and not, as it was said, from the effects of changing the color of his skin). Robert Bonazzi wrote a biography, Reluctant Activist: Authorized Biography of John Howard Griffin, which describes Griffin’s life and his spiritual journey with lengthy quotes from his diaries.

Griffin surprised the racists in their lie: it was all about color.

The experience

Griffin Black like me reads like a series of diary entries describing a six-week period in which, with the help of medication, UV light treatments, and a sponge stain, he darkened his skin. He then went out in public in New Orleans and Mississippi and saw that everything for him had changed.

His message is told in his reflections on what he sees and experiences and in the words of African Americans who speak frankly to him. As for the racist whites in their conversations with Griffin, they die for it. Of particular note are the book’s descriptions of the intense pressure on moderate whites to adhere to a racist system and racist attitudes.

Admittedly, not much happens during this experience; he is neither attacked nor beaten. But its details are enough to open a window to Jim Crow’s segregated world. Griffin, along with others such as James Baldwin, attempted to explore the question of why so many white Americans have and have an unhealthy need to keep racism alive. And one can feel some frustration when reading Griffin, because although a lot has changed since 1961, many white people still have very ignorant and racist attitudes.

Griffin’s book became the 1964 film “Black Like Me”, starring James Whitmore. Meyer Kupferman wrote a powerful and daring musical score for the film. (The film can be found on YouTube.) The DVD version includes the documentary “Uncommon Vision: The Life and Times of John Howard Griffin”.

Griffin admitted he was conducting an experiment. The racist’s claim is that discriminatory treatment on the basis of race is not about skin color, but about a fundamental difference in character. Griffin surprised the racists in their lie: it was all about color. Nothing had changed about him except his color, but when that did, most white people treated him very differently. Once his color changed, he couldn’t even eat at his favorite New Orleans restaurant. After several weeks, he stopped taking the medicine and stopped coloring; his skin returned to its normal color, and then he was able to enter the restaurant.

Griffin was not the only white writer to conduct the same experiment. Ray Sprigle described his experience in his 1949 book In the land of Jim Crow. Grace Halsell wrote about her experiences in Soul Sister: The Story of a White Woman Who Turned Black and went to Live and Work in Harlem and Mississippi. (Halsell spoke to Griffin before his trip to Harlem.)

Readers resume Black like me for the first time can find it touching in its simplicity.

The epilogue

In subsequent editions of Black like meGriffin added an insightful epilogue that shows just how intractable the problem of racism was in white society in the United States. Griffin found that many people read his book and were willing to listen to him speak, but didn’t seem willing to read or hear African American authors speak. He describes how he would travel with African-American comedian and activist Dick Gregory to speak to crowds. They agreed to make the same points in their talks. Griffin received warm responses with much applause, while Gregory, saying the same things, was greeted with hostility.

Griffin also described how towns and villages would invite him to speak out on racial issues in their communities while ignoring African American leaders. White leaders weren’t listening to local black leaders, but they wanted Griffin’s thoughts.

Inheritance

Today some might question the wisdom and legitimacy of a white man trying to show the African American experience. How could he really understand it? And why can’t people just read African American authors? But it should be borne in mind that although there are many media today where one can find a wide range of African-American voices speaking about their own experiences, this has not always been the case. case. Sixty years ago, very few such opportunities existed.

Readers who are reading this modest-sized book for the first time may find it touching in its simplicity. Such readers would do well then to read Griffin’s follow-up book, The Church and the Black Man. And then, of course: start reading James Baldwin.

Many of the people who most need to hear the ideas in these books are not interested. Many Americans are encouraged to retreat further into their fear, outrage, and ignorance. And more tragically, as we remember the 60th anniversary of the publication of Black like me, we may have to face the reality that we will still be facing these problems 60 years from now.


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shepherds watching | National Catholic journalist https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/shepherds-watching-national-catholic-journalist/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 02:32:59 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/shepherds-watching-national-catholic-journalist/ “Glory to God in the highest heavens, and peace on earth to those on whom his favor rests” (Luke 2:14). Christmas Eve Because Christmas takes place on a Saturday this year, the Lectionary is exhibiting its treasures in rapid succession starting Friday, December 24. The mass of the day has the Canticle of Zacharie, then […]]]>

“Glory to God in the highest heavens, and peace on earth to those on whom his favor rests” (Luke 2:14).

Christmas Eve

Because Christmas takes place on a Saturday this year, the Lectionary is exhibiting its treasures in rapid succession starting Friday, December 24. The mass of the day has the Canticle of Zacharie, then for the vigil the genealogy of Matthew. Most churches will celebrate their main liturgy on Friday evening using the majestic birth announcement of Isaiah 9: 1-6 and the familiar gospel of Luke 2: 1-14 on the birth of Jesus and the message of Jesus. angel to the shepherds. A dawn mass on Saturday, December 25, continues the story of Luke of the shepherds arriving at the crib (2: 15-20), and finally, for the mass on Christmas day, the prologue of John 1: 1- 18

We then catch our breath and celebrate the Holy Family on Sunday, December 26. With six services in total for the weekend, it is only at the Triduum leading up to Easter that Catholics will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in so much scripture and liturgy focused on the core beliefs of our faith. Families with crib sets will have to wait until after New Years Day, a Saturday, to celebrate the Magi on the feast of Epiphany, January 2, before putting everything away until 2022. Catholic culture can do. competing with other vacation distractions is an annual matter, although some will try.

Whatever culture, secular or sacred, demands our attention, the world will still be teeming with the timeless divinity in all things and the redemptive activity of Jesus Christ through the members of his body, born in a manger, glorified on the cross, being reborn in the church at Pentecost and sent to transform hearts and history until the end of time.

Christmas remains the only spectacle in town on such a cosmic scale, even though every diary makes the headlines. God is the Lord of Creation, at work by the Holy Spirit to bring mankind together into a beloved community which is the purpose of our evolving Universe. How long it takes to tune the song in the story into harmony is God’s challenge for us to be the people of peace and goodwill that the heavenly choir invited to find the child on Christmas morning .

Shepherds, essential workers with night jobs, were the first to know that God had come for all who were left behind, displaced and despised, that they were the perfect messengers of the kind of savior Jesus would be. They knew how to find the stable on the hillside where a desperate couple could keep a newborn baby wrapped in rags and out of the wind. It is their world that God chose to begin the story of redemption.

Perhaps it is because there is so much noise and neglect in our conflicted and distracted lives that we yearn for the peace and simplicity of the Christmas story. Pulsed lights and glowing screens blind us to the gift of clarity and stars from the night sky that shows us how empty life becomes without real human relationships and without compassion for all around us in the hope of a place at the table. God has come to teach us to become human again, and it always begins within the community and the circle of life.

This reflection is about Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. The preaching in pencil will resume on Saturday to reflect on Holy Family Sunday.


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The Catholic difference: the sanctity of Christmas – Catholic Standard https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/the-catholic-difference-the-sanctity-of-christmas-catholic-standard/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 06:13:12 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/the-catholic-difference-the-sanctity-of-christmas-catholic-standard/ Rome – A huge, 16 volumes The life of the saints, first published between 1872 and 1877, informs me that here in the Eternal City, the feast of Christmas first became a separate celebration of the ancient feast of Epiphany in the mid-fourth century – and that Saint John Chrysostom, one of the four doctors […]]]>

Rome – A huge, 16 volumes The life of the saints, first published between 1872 and 1877, informs me that here in the Eternal City, the feast of Christmas first became a separate celebration of the ancient feast of Epiphany in the mid-fourth century – and that Saint John Chrysostom, one of the four doctors of the Church who uphold the cathedra in Bernini’s bronze masterpiece, The altar of the pulpit, in the Vatican Basilica, “made every effort” to promote the celebration of Christmas in the Christian East.

The author, in his charming and verbose Victorian style, then catalogs the relics of the Nativity, here in Rome and elsewhere:

“… In the church of Santa Maria Maggiore [is] the cradle of Bethlehem, inlaid with silver and enriched with ornaments offered by Philip III of Spain.

“The towels with which the Child Savior was wrapped were once exhibited in Constantinople, but were transferred to Paris in the 13th century and placed by Saint Louis in the Sainte Chapelle.

“Besides the cradle in which our Lord, they say, was cradled, is the stone crib in the cave of Bethlehem. One of the stones of this crib is represented in the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore on the Esquiline, in the altar of the crypt of the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament.

“Some of Christ’s napkins are also on display for the worship of Catholics in the same chapel. The mantle with which Saint Joseph covered the manger, to protect the Child from the cold, is in the Church of Saint Anastasia in Rome. The Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome is also blessed with having the first cuts of her child’s hair.

Judging by 21st century standards, does any of this make historical sense? Some, probably, but forensic certainty on ancient artifacts isn’t really the issue here. Because behind these traditional and pious claims, as behind the visit in the 4th century of the Empress Dowager Hélène (mother of the Emperor Constantine) to the Holy Land – a long and dangerous pilgrimage which brought many of these relics to the West – lurks a crucial conviction: the conviction that Christianity is neither a pious myth nor a fairy tale.

Christianity begins in a real place, at a precise moment when real men and women met a traveling rabbi named Jesus of Nazareth – and after what they thought was the utter catastrophe of his degrading and violent death, have it. met again as the Risen Lord Jesus. The lives of these true men and women were so transformed by these encounters that they in turn went out and set to work on the task that the Risen One had entrusted to them: “to make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19).

The earthy side of the Christmas story – the manger, the stable, the swaddling clothes, the flabby oxen and the bellowing cows, the stunned but benevolent shepherds, the exotic magi of the East and their golden gifts, incense and myrrh, the circumcision of the child – emphasizes this fundamental Christian conviction: the second person of the Most Holy Trinity, the “Word” by which “all things were made” (Jeans 1: 1, 3), made history through the cooperation of a young Jewish girl and her shadow by the Holy Spirit, and was born at a specific time in a specific place.

That “the first cuts of her childish hair” actually were in the Rome Basilica of the Holy Cross in Jerusalem may be beyond historical verification; the real point made in such claims is that the incarnate Son of God was truly at one point in his life among us a child who had the hair of a child and all the other attributes of a weak and helpless child.

Ditto for what is actually proposed by the “towels”, the cradle, the blanket-mantle of Saint Joseph and all the rest: He whom Christianity proclaims Lord and Savior, He who fully reveals both the truth about God and the truth about the dignity and fate of our humanity, was not a character in a virtual reality “metaverse” constructed by Mr. Mark Zuckerberg. It was here, on this third planet of the solar system. And He is always with us: in the scriptures proclaimed, and especially in the holy bread broken and shared.

As the post-modern world loses its grip on the most basic truths (even those inscribed in our chromosomes), the terror of Christmas proclaims and celebrates an incarnate divine savior, once a child, who ennobles and transforms all the data of the world. human condition.

(George Weigel, Distinguished Senior Fellow and William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, writes the Catholic Difference column for Catholic media.)


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Div. Boys 1-2 Basketball Preview Players to Watch – Boston Herald https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/div-boys-1-2-basketball-preview-players-to-watch-boston-herald/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 10:29:01 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/div-boys-1-2-basketball-preview-players-to-watch-boston-herald/ Andover coach Dave Fazio has been around long enough to know when a good winter is ahead for his schedule. He’s never been as optimistic as he is for this season. Led by a remarkable frontcourt with 6-9 Aidan Cammann and 6-7 Logan Satlow, the Golden Warriors are a team to beat in Div. 1. […]]]>

Andover coach Dave Fazio has been around long enough to know when a good winter is ahead for his schedule. He’s never been as optimistic as he is for this season.

Led by a remarkable frontcourt with 6-9 Aidan Cammann and 6-7 Logan Satlow, the Golden Warriors are a team to beat in Div. 1. There are many prominent pieces around Cammann and Satlow. All-Conference Ryan Maclellan is back to lead the offense while Richie Shantanian is a constant threat beyond the arc.

“In the 33 years that I’ve been here, we’ve never been this size,” said Fazio. “Between Aidan and Logan, plus Ryan and Richie, we also have Lincoln Beal, the running back for the football team, so we have all the pieces. Now it’s pretty much all coming together.

Cammann was a Boston Herald Dream Teamer as a junior, averaging 15 points and 10 rebounds to go with three blocks per night. Satlow signed up to Franklin & Marshall in September.

Elsewhere in the MVC, Central Catholic is set for a solid season behind senior All-Scholastic point guard Xavier McKenzie. Methuen and Lawrence are suitors.

Beverly did the Div. 2 state semi-finals in 2020 and now hope to compete in Div. 1. Gabe Copeland is a three-year-old college player and was a Boston Herald All-Scholastic last year averaging nearly 18 points per game. Taunton will be a force in the Hockomock Kelley-Rex.

Bill Loughnane has four state championships on his resume; a look at his team BC High shows that a fifth could be in the near future. Senior Mike Loughnane is one of the region’s best handyman playmakers while Mahari Guerrier, Greg Cooper and Will Doyle showcase an athletic starting squad.

Newton North has a long history of being a factor throughout the state and this year shouldn’t be any different. The Tigers have three returning starters with Holland Hargens, Jose Padilla and Florian Kuechan leading the veteran group. Also in the Bay State Conference, Natick returns small forward Ryan Mela (21 points, 10 rebounds per game last year), while Brookline and Braintree will be in the game.

For a decade, Mansfield was at the top of the Div. 1, but with the new rosters, the Hornets will now try to be at the top of the Div. 2. Chris Hill can play indoors and outdoors as point guard Matt Hyland kicks off the Hornets’ ever-formidable offense. A year after winning their first Catholic conference in nearly 25 years, Malden Catholic will be one of the best teams in the world. The Lancers’ offense goes through four-year-old starter Tony Felder with Nick Martinez, Jahmari Hamilton Brown and KC Ugwuakazi creating a powerful overall lineup.

Elsewhere in Div. 2, Whitman-Hanson stars senior guards Amari Jamison and Ryan Vallacourt as well as forward Malcolm Alcorn-Crowder. Scituate looks set for a strong rebound this winter, highlighted by star playmaker Keegan Sullivan and forward Sam Benning.

Charlestown appears to be a threat to contend with thanks to Joshua Dejesus, Victor Soto, and Ricky Cabral. Dracut has reached Division 2 under the new rosters and believes he has what it takes to compete with the best with the return of senior full-back Adrian Torres.

North Quincy are a team to watch with sophomore star Daithi Quinn while Pembroke could be a sleeper in Matt Vincenzi’s first year at the helm. Tri-Valley League contenders Norwood and Westwood are expected to be at the top of their divisions throughout the season.

PLAYERS TO WATCH IN DIV. 1

VS : Aidan Cammann (Andover), Pat Doyle (Weymouth), Nick Johannes (Hingham), Isaiah Ogunbare (Lawrence), Connor Walden (Marshfield)

F: Ital Alinksy (Newton South), Nick Braganca (Beverly), Danny Clancy (King Philip), Gabe Copeland (Beverly), Will Doyle (Catholic Memorial), Jordan Gorham (Braintree), Holland Hargens (Newton North), Florian Kuechen (Newton North), Shea Lynch (Peabody), John McClaren (Bridgewater-Raynham), Ryan Mela (Natick), Eoin Morrissey (Catholic Memorial), Quinten Pienaar (Winchester), Rob Pombriant (Bishop Feehan), Logan Satlow (Andover), Zach Solem (Brookline), Kyle Webster (St. John’s Prep), Jeffrey White (Cambridge), Trevor White (Attleboro), Tyler Wilson (Lynn English)

G: Danny Barrett (Peabody), Braylin Castillo (Lawrence), CJ Cox (Lexington), Henry DiGregorio (Franklin), Jesse Doherty (Reading), Joe Gattuso (Woburn), Mahari Guerrier (BC High), Liam Harrington (Concord-Carlisle) , Tristan Henry (Taunton), Evan Houle (Attleboro), Nate Kasper (Hopkinton), Florian Kuechen (Newton North), Rock Landman (Beverly), Will LaPlante (King Philip), Jake Lemelan (Newton South), Mike Loughnane (BC High), Aidan Olivier Louis (Cambridge), Peter Loutzenheiser (Cambridge), Ryan MacLellan (Andover), Jesse Maggs (Lynn English), Xavier McKenzie (Central Catholic), Tyrese Melo-Garcia (Lynn English), Evan Millerica (Marshfield) , Cameron Monteiro (Brockton), John Monexant (Everett), Curtis Murphy (Hingham), Jack O’Connell (North Andover), Jose Padilla (Newton North), Josh Poretto (Acton-Boxboro), Marcus Rivera (Central Catholic), Jeter Santiago (Lowell), Trent Santos (Taunton), Philip Sughrue (Winchester), Devani Perez Valentin (Brookline), Davio Visochi (Waltham)

PLAYERS TO WATCH IN DIV. 2

C / F: Treston Abreu (Salem), Max Alper (Bedford), Matt Baur (Sharon), Sam Benning (Scituate), Tyrone Cunningham (Marblehead), Ethan Dias (Somerset Berkley), Matt Forman (Bedford), Colm Geary (Malden Catholic), Dylan Gordon (Foxboro), Jahmari Hamilton-Brown (Malden Catholic), Chris Hill (Mansfield), Ryan Ouellette (Dighton-Rehoboth), Alex Penders (Foxboro), Daithi Quinn (North Quincy), KC Ugwuakazi (Malden Catholic)

G: Connor Andrews (Stoughton), Bryuan Aweb-Kisob (Bedford), Drew Baxter (Oliver Ames), Noah Beaudet (Norwood), Jacob Briggs (Middleboro), Ronan Brown (Newburyport), Sam Cohen (Sharon), Ben Dillon (Masconomet) , Russell Dolabany (Westwood), Tony Felder (Malden Catholic), Matt Hyland (Mansfield), Jack Fehlner (Newburyport), Amari Jamison (Whitman-Hanson), Shane Mahoney (Burlington), Tommy Malinson (Wilmington), Noah Mann (Marblehead) ), Brady Martin (Billerica), Nick Martinez (Malden Catholic), Kyle Murray (Westwood), Gianna Perea (Middleboro), Adam Quinn (Wakefield), Brady Rosenberg (North Attleboro), Jake Rymsza (Ashland), Alex Sainlaire (Billerica) ), Joey Steeves (Norwood), Keegan Sullivan (Scituate), Adrian Torres (Dracut), Ryan Vaillancourt (Whitman-Hanson)


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Illinois repeals parental advisory abortion law “a dark and shameful time” – Catholic Telegraph https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/illinois-repeals-parental-advisory-abortion-law-a-dark-and-shameful-time-catholic-telegraph/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 18:04:30 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/illinois-repeals-parental-advisory-abortion-law-a-dark-and-shameful-time-catholic-telegraph/ Springfield, Ill., Dec. 17 2021 / 17:01 Illinois Governor JB Pritzker on Friday signed the repeal of the state’s parental abortion notice law, a move that has sparked dismay among Catholics and pro-lifers in the state . Under the repeal, which the Democratic governor signed on Dec. 17, minors will no longer be required to […]]]>

Illinois Governor JB Pritzker on Friday signed the repeal of the state’s parental abortion notice law, a move that has sparked dismay among Catholics and pro-lifers in the state .

Under the repeal, which the Democratic governor signed on Dec. 17, minors will no longer be required to notify an adult before requesting an abortion. The repeal, which the Illinois legislature passed in October, takes effect June 1, 2022.

Bishop Thomas Paprocki of Springfield, Ill. Called the signing of the bill “a dark and shameful moment in the history of the state of Illinois … It is striking how much this legislation provides cover, a secret and a darkness to evil deeds ”.

“This legislative action violates the most basic rights and duties entrusted by God to parents to ensure the health and safety of their children,” Paprocki said.

“It is a right and a responsibility that God grants, and that no government can take away. In trying to do so, this legislation acts directly against the will of God, which is the very definition of evil … This most heinous offense against God and neighbor [abortion] is now made more readily available to underage children than tattoos or ear piercing.

Illinois’ Parental Notification Act was passed in 1995 but was not implemented until 2013 after a court battle. She required that abortion providers notify the parents of a minor wishing to have an abortion at least 48 hours before the scheduled abortion, except in certain cases where the minor could not notify a family member. A minor was allowed to seek a judge’s approval to circumvent the notification requirement.

“Thirty-seven states, and every other state in the Midwest, has at least one parental notice of abortion laws,” the state’s Catholic Conference said in October. “However, Illinois is no longer among them. What an ignominious result for those who supported and voted for the bill. “

The repeal not only endangers children who abort and facilitates the murder of children in such abortions, Paprocki said, but it also grants “a free pass to sex traffickers” who would enslave women and girls. and force them to have an abortion.

“The government is rightly exercising its authority by making laws that protect minors from making life-changing decisions they are not equipped to make, by establishing laws that prohibit children from sunbathing, buying lottery tickets, buying cigarettes and buying alcohol and tobacco, ”Paprocki pointed out.

“Minors cannot undergo a piercing without parental consent, nor undergo any other invasive medical procedure without parental consent. By removing the parental notification requirement, our government has knowingly placed our children in danger of death and physical harm. “

A March 2021 report from the ACLU Illinois and Human Rights Watch, which supported the repeal, said about 1,000 minors abort each year in Illinois.

Paprocki concluded his statement with prayers for the conversion of the hearts of those who made the abrogation possible.

“We pray today for a conversion of heart and a renewal of spirit among those who hold authority and who have perpetrated this evil on our people. We solemnly pray this day also for the protection of the many children and families endangered by this unjust law, ”Paprocki concluded.

Illinois is not the first state to take legal steps to protect the “privacy” of minors who request abortions.

California has a parental consent law for minors seeking an abortion, but the law is permanently enforced by a court order, which means minors in California can request an abortion without their parents’ knowledge or without. permission from their parents. And in September, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill that allows policyholders, including minors, to keep “sensitive services” confidential from the policyholder, usually their parents.


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Jennifer Lopez’s film made history in the US Congress https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/jennifer-lopezs-film-made-history-in-the-us-congress/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 07:43:07 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/jennifer-lopezs-film-made-history-in-the-us-congress/ Thousands of films are released around the world each year, but few films make history from theaters. Play Jennifer lopez, Biographical file “Selena”Now part of the selected list United States Library of Congress For its cultural significance. Selected by National Film Protection Office Integrate the selection National film record, The film tells the story of […]]]>

Thousands of films are released around the world each year, but few films make history from theaters. Play Jennifer lopez, Biographical file “Selena”Now part of the selected list United States Library of Congress For its cultural significance.

Selected by National Film Protection Office Integrate the selection National film record, The film tells the story of the singer Selena Quintanilla-PerezTragically died at the age of 23.

Read more:

Films help reflect our cultural history and creativity – and show us new ways of seeing ourselves – but films are not always seen as worth preserving. The National Film Registry preserves our film heritage and is proud to add 25 more films this year.“, he said Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress.

Written and directed by Gregory Nava, “Selena“Was screened in 1997 and is available today HBO Max. Other highlights of the topics selected this year “Wall-e“, Since 2008; “Star Wars: Return of the Jedi“, 1983; and”The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring», Since 2001. See the full list below:

1. Ringling Brothers Parade Film (1902)
2. Joy (1919)
3. Flight ace (1926)
4. The train to hell (1930)
5. Flowers and trees (1932)
6. Strangers on the train (1951)
seven. What happened to baby Jane? (1962)
8. Evergreen (1965)
9. Request -29 (1970)
ten. Murder of Fred Hampton (1971)
11. Pink flamingos (1972)
12. Sounder (1972)
13. Long goodbye (1973)
14. Wages are high (1975)
15. Richard Fryer: in concert (1979)
16. Sikana (1979)
17. Oscillate (1979)
18. Star Wars: Return of the Jedi (1983)
19. Freddy (1984)
20 Stop making sense (1984)
21. Who killed Vincent Chin? (1987)
22. Watermelon girl (1996)
23. Selena (1997)
24. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
25. Wall-E (2008)

Jennifer Lopez says she still feels ‘weird’ in Hollywood

Photo: Authorized app for Getty Images / POPline.

Jennifer lopez is one of the biggest names in Hollywood Today, that’s why sometimes he was surprised to learn that he was “weird” there. This confession was featured on her makeup brand’s Instagram post. JLO Beauty, last Thursday (16).

In the post, it was meant to be celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month (In translation, the month of the Hispanic tradition), JLO promotes its products to Sephora and tells a little about its history, its Latin origin, shares the beauty secrets of its family and concludes by noting the insecurity: “Like most people, I know that it is important for all of us to think that we belong. Many times in your life you feel like a stranger, sometimes I feel it in Hollywood, I still feel this, but the truth is you only need your little tribeThe actress, who has appeared in more than 30 films, said.

Latins are fearless and powerful, and can achieve anything they want.Says the headline.



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Mourning, prayer and determination to rebuild follow devastating tornadoes https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/mourning-prayer-and-determination-to-rebuild-follow-devastating-tornadoes/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 16:30:30 +0000 https://catholicscomehomeboston.org/mourning-prayer-and-determination-to-rebuild-follow-devastating-tornadoes/ MAYFIELD, Ky. (CNS) – Mourning, prayer and determination to rebuild shattered lives, homes and businesses in Mayfield followed one of the most powerful tornadoes in U.S. history that wiped out the town of 10,000 in western Kentucky on the night of December 10. Bluegrass state was hit hardest as numerous devastating tornadoes swept through it […]]]>

MAYFIELD, Ky. (CNS) – Mourning, prayer and determination to rebuild shattered lives, homes and businesses in Mayfield followed one of the most powerful tornadoes in U.S. history that wiped out the town of 10,000 in western Kentucky on the night of December 10.

Bluegrass state was hit hardest as numerous devastating tornadoes swept through it and its neighboring states of Illinois, Tennessee, Arkansas and Missouri, leveling entire communities.

As of early December 13, at least 34 people had died, but rescue efforts were still underway in Mayfield and elsewhere.

Twenty of those who perished were in Kentucky, and six died when a roof collapsed in an Amazon warehouse in Illinois.

As members of two of Mayfield’s religious congregations gathered to pray on December 12 amid the rubble – piles of bricks, metal and glass – prayers for their town and all those touched by the fierce Mid-December tornadoes came from afar, including Pope Francis and the American Catholic Bishops, and from close to home – Bishop William F. Medley of Owensboro, whose diocese covers western Kentucky .

A papal telegram transmitted by Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state, said Pope Francis “was saddened to learn of the devastating impact of tornadoes” in the Midwest and South.

“He offers sincere prayers that Almighty God will grant eternal peace to those who have died, comfort to those who mourn their loss and strength to all those touched by this immense tragedy,” he said. he declares.

“With his gratitude for the tireless efforts of rescuers and all those caring for the injured, grieving families and the homeless, Pope Francis calls on all those engaged in the massive work of relief and reconstruction of the gifts of strength and generous perseverance from the Lord in the service of their brothers and sisters ”, indicates the telegram that Cardinal Parolin sent to Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio in the United States.

Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, and Archbishop Paul S. Coakley of Oklahoma City, president of the USCCB Committee on Homeland Justice and Development human, said the destruction and devastation was “heartbreaking” and called for prayer and assistance for all who were on the path of storms.

“During this season of Advent when we await with joy the birth of our Lord, we pray for those who have been wounded, for those who have lost their lives and for their families and communities in mourning”, declared the Archbishops Gomez and Coakley. “May those who have been affected by these storms find peace, comfort and hope in our faith and in the infinite love of God.

“We also pray for emergency responders and those who have started responding to the needs of affected people in these communities as part of the recovery efforts,” they said in a statement released in late December. “We entrust all our brothers and sisters in danger to our Blessed Mother, and we ask for her continued protection and intercession to comfort those who are suffering.

Both prelates urged Catholics and all people of good will to donate to recovery efforts and financial assistance for tornado victims by supporting the work of Catholic Charities USA: https: //www.catholiccharities. us / campaign / ccusa-disaster-relief / c353051.

Bishop Medley, in a December 11 statement, called on the Catholic community in the diocese “to unite in prayer … for all the suffering caused by this catastrophe.”

He asked all parishes to organize a special collection on the weekend of December 11-12 to help victims of the tornado.

The bishop also took note of the leveling of the Mayfield candle factory, where 110 employees worked around the clock, which is customary during the Christmas season, according to reports.

Initially, city officials feared the death toll among factory workers could reach 70. At the end of December 12, a company official told reporters that eight workers had been confirmed dead and eight were still missing, but the rest had been counted.

“Many of those injured at the Mayfield Candle Factory were parishioners, and others represented migrants and marginalized in our communities,” Bishop Medley said in his statement.

He added that through its Catholic Charities office, the diocese planned to “offer immediate assistance and services” to those displaced by the tornado and / or in need of immediate emergency financial assistance.

“I am proud of the many ways in which your generosity still enables the Catholic Church to respond to suffering and to families in crisis,” said Bishop Medley. “So I thank you in advance for your generous response to this terrible devastation. God will bless our generosity.

In a December 12 tweet, Bishop Medley said he had visited the Catholic community at St. Joseph’s Church in Mayfield: “Fr. Eric Riley, the pastor, preached on Advent themes. and of Our Lady of Guadalupe, hope and joy. The neighboring Saint-Jérôme parish of Fancy Farm welcomed them.

During a December 12 media briefing in Mayfield, Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear noted that a tornado had traveled 227 miles. “It didn’t take a roof, as we’ve seen in the past. I blew up the whole house. The people, the animals… have just disappeared.

“The very first thing we have to do is grieve together,” he said, “and we’ll do that before we rebuild together.”

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Copyright © 2021 Catholic News Service / United States Conference of Catholic Bishops


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