California bill would create COVID-19 vaccination mandate for employees

A California bill seeks to require all businesses in the state to mandate the COVID-19 vaccine for their employees. Democratic Assemblies. Buffy Wicks of Oakland, Cecilia Aguiar-Curry of Winters, Evan Low of Cupertino and Akila Weber of San Diego introduced the 1993 Assembly Bill last week. The bill would require all businesses in California to require their employees to show proof that they have been vaccinated against COVID-19 or have a religious or medical reason for not getting vaccinated. “I come from a very small town where we took care of our neighbors, and that’s one of those things where I feel like we take care of our neighbors,” Aguiar-Curry said. The bill makes no mention of testing requirements for employees with religious and medical exemptions. Companies that fail to follow the rules could be fined, although the bill does not specify the amount of the penalty. Many employees, such as government employees, healthcare workers, and police officers, already have COVID-19 vaccine requirements. However, this bill would go beyond that, applying a mandate to all public and even private employers. The California Chamber of Commerce said it is still reviewing the bill. The California Restaurant Association has yet to comment. Small Business Majority, an advocacy organization, supports the bill. “Coronavirus variants continue to disrupt business operations and create financial uncertainty for small businesses in California and across the country,” said Small John Arensmeyer, founder and CEO of Business Majority. “Small business owners don’t want to be traffic cops in public safety debates; they’re looking for a common, statewide standard that disentangles them from politics and allows them to operate their businesses. in a safe and predictable way. We need to enact bold policies that will give small businesses in California the certainty they need to operate at full capacity and help them get back to normal. However, other local business owners are against it. the bill. For example, Matthew Oliver, owner of the House of Oliver in Roseville, thinks the bill will make life harder for business owners like him. “We have a lot of staff who have received the vaccine, and we have a lot of staff members who, for all sorts of reasons, don’t want to get vaccinated. We are a state where we have really fought for people to have individual identity and the freedom to choose,” Oliver said. The bill says it would repeal provisions when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determines that COVID-19 vaccinations are no longer necessary for public health and safety.

A California bill seeks to require all businesses in the state to mandate the COVID-19 vaccine for their employees.

Democratic Assemblies. Buffy Wicks of Oakland, Cecilia Aguiar-Curry of Winters, Evan Low of Cupertino and Akila Weber of San Diego introduced the 1993 Assembly Bill last week.

The bill would require all businesses in California to require their employees to show proof that they have been vaccinated against COVID-19 or have a religious or medical reason not to be vaccinated.

“I come from a very small town where we took care of our neighbors, and that’s one of those things where I feel like we take care of our neighbors,” Aguiar-Curry said.

The bill makes no mention of testing requirements for employees with religious and medical exemptions.

Companies that fail to follow the rules could be fined, although the bill does not specify the amount of the penalty.

Many employees, such as government employees, healthcare workers, and police officers, already have COVID-19 vaccine requirements. However, this bill would go further by applying a mandate to all public and even private employers.

The California Chamber of Commerce said it is still reviewing the bill. The California Restaurant Association has yet to comment.

Small Business Majority, an advocacy organization, supports the bill.

“Coronavirus variants continue to disrupt business operations and create financial uncertainty for small businesses in California and across the country,” said John Arensmeyer, founder and CEO of Small Business Majority. “Small business owners don’t want to be traffic cops in public safety debates; they’re looking for a common, statewide standard that disentangles them from politics and allows them to operate their We need to adopt bold policies that will give small businesses in California the certainty they need to operate at full capacity and help them get back to normal.

However, other local business owners are against the bill. For example, Matthew Oliver, owner of the House of Oliver in Roseville, thinks the bill will make it harder for business owners like him.

“We have a lot of staff who have been vaccinated, and we have a lot of staff who for all sorts of reasons don’t want to be vaccinated. We’re a state where we’ve really fought to have the people have an individual identity and the freedom to choose,” Oliver said.

The bill says it would repeal the provisions when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determines that COVID-19 vaccinations are no longer necessary for public health and safety.

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